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WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 4867 




00650 2282 




Wal. Ref. 
EDUCATION 

1944 









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COMMENCEMENT 

1944 




WALTKAM PUBLfc 
ARCHIVES 



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,—o_,*,,_,-„_—„ Class of 1944 




MR. GEORGE WOODMAN 

Former Faculty Business Manager of the Mirror and Instructor in 

Economic Geography 



Dedication 



We, the Class of 1944 of Waltham High 
School, dedicate this Commencement Issue of the 
Mirror to Mr. George S. Woodman, who is now 
serving in the United States Army. As faculty 
manager of the Business Staff of the Mirror, he 
contributed no small part towards its success. 
Few were aware of his many responsibilities and 
of the long hours and untiring efforts he gave. 
We want to express our deep appreciation of his 
fine leadership and kindly guidance, both as a 
business manager and as a teacher, and to wish 
him every success in his Army life. 






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1944 



THE MIRROR 

"-to l\olb as 'ifnere, iije mirror up to nature" 
Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 



Editorial Staff 



Robert Bruce 

Nancy Newcomb 
Robert Guba 

Flora D'Angio 

ART EDITORS 

John Cobb 
Robert Olney 

ALUMNI EDITOR 

Beverly Myers 



EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 



BUSINESS MANAGERS 



Evelyn Uberti 

Betty Viles 

Mary Hill 

Alexander Wenckus 

SPORTS EDITORS 

Richard Whitcomb 
Alisca Cullen 

MUSIC EDITOR 

Joanne Johnson 



EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Gene Sharpies 



HUMOR EDITORS 

Betty Ryan 
Aloyse Martin 
BUSINESS AND ADVERTISING STAFF 



Amelia Cardillo 
Lois Coolidge . 
Lois Freeman 
Eleanor Morreale 
Charles Koulopoulos 
Howard Hunter 
Laurie Haynes 
Frances Smith 



Fay Wenckus 
Adele Waldman 
Priscilla Woodward 
Virginia Oliveri 
Joseph Giamo 
Wendell Martin 
Effie Bohannon 
Jean Eberhard 



Richard Hart 



STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Harold Whitney, Chairman 
Richard Berry 
Kenneth Heinz 
David Law 

LITERARY COMMITTEE 



Brenton Tyler 
Barbara Kelly 
Rose Giardina 
Janice Myers 
Marion Noonan 
Jane Flagg 
Selma Kaufman 
Marilyn Powers 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Literary Department 
Business Department 
Art Department 



Lorraine Cousins 
Amelia Cardillo 
Doris Henderson 
Roger Robinson 
Walter Hawley 
June Kelly 
Norma Algeri 
Theresa Mase 

Miss Viets 

Mr. Hood 

Miss Burgess 



Arrangement, Make-up and Presswork by the Pupils of The Arthur A. Hansen Trade School Printing 

Shop under the direction of Mr. J. H. Nottenburg 



Class of 1944 



COMMENCEMENT ISSUE 
Dedication 

Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 
Waltham High School Faculty 
In the Armed Forces 
Class Officers 
Class Poem 
Who's Who 
Class History 
Class Will 
Class Prophecy 
School Activities 
Just Pictures 
Athletics 



Alisca Cullen 

Beverly Myers 

Gene Sharpies 

Victor Mangini 




CHARLES W. GOODRICH 

Headmaster 






Class of 1944 — 



»-o^^»<>^^(>4^*o4 



. 




WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Winter 1944 

WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 

John W. McDevitt, Superintendent of Schools 

Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 

George L. Ward, Sub-Master 



Miriam C Allen 
Evelyn Bliss 
Walter E. Brinn 
Amy J. Burgess 
Lilla E. Clement 
Miriam F. Cunningham 
Paul F. Curry 
Arline B. Darmedy 
Ethelyn Nolan Devine 
Thelma L. Eaton 
Lawrence W. Elliot 
Doris M. Esterbrook 
Harriet I. Flagg 
Marion E. Frost 
James Garrahan 
Anne C. Graverson 
Myrtle L. Grover 



Lucille Hanna 

Urania B. Hart 

Helen G. Hirst 

Alfred T. Hodge 

Ralph C Hollis 

Richard F. Hood 

Susan B. Hunter 

Dorothy M. Hyde 

John L. Leary 

George W. Lees 

Mary Madden 

Dorothy Mankowich 

Olive T. Marden {substitute) 

Louise G. McCullough 

Ester F. Mehring 

Donald B. Mitchell 

Mary C. Mooney 



Almon W. Morang 

Lionel M. Mosher 

Margaret M. Nolan 

Arthur W. Reynolds 

Alice N. Rigby 

Edith Scottron 

Louise Sewall 

Francis E. Sheehy 

Cecil M. Spencer 

Dorothy M. Stewart 

Ruby E. Viets 

George L. Ward 

Grace L. Woodward 

Helen Tierney, school nurse 

{substitute) 
Marion B. Davis, clerk 
Christine M. Cusano, clerk 



IN THE SERVICE 

Robert W. Power (substitute) Edward D. May 2 Jr. 

Francis M. Curran Thomas A. Roach 

William J. Gallagher George S. Woodman 




OUR NATION'S CAPITOL 



3n ttje &rmeb termer 



U. S. ARMY 
John Doiron Harold Kenney 

Robert Everett Walter MacDougal 

Amelio Florio John Shea 

Earl Porter (trade school) Leigh Woodward 

U. S. NAVY 

George Hatfield 



Edward Johnson 
Michael Koulopoulos 
Bernie Nussinow 
Rudolph Perilli 



Eugene Clark 

Lawrence Cole 

Peter Collura 

James Gormley 

Robert Guiney 

Frank Harper (trade school) 

Veto Stalman (trade school) 

Harry Tapply 

U. S. MARINE CORPS 
Robert Olney 
Chester Page 
Arthur Ritchie 
William Smith 







George L. Ward, Sub-Master 
Class Advisor 



SENIORS 




■ . .. ;:,-:■ : i - 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Michael Koulopoulos, President 

Hazel Dunbrack, Auditor 

Walter Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer 

Patricia Robinson, Vice-President 






ABORN, MARILYN 

Business Course 

'Mai," "Krupe," or "Tommy" can 
be heard 6aying, "Are you kidding 
or just hopeful t" but it is no kid- 
ding when she says that after help- 
ing win the war in the R. C. A. J)', 
she hopes to be an orchestra leader. 
She has been a drummer in the band 
and member of the Dramatic Club 
for one year, she likes popcorn, 
apples, anything chocolate, and chew- 
ing gum ; while she detests conceited 
people, girls who smoke on the 
street, and, of all things, Frank 
Sinatra. 

"0 it's Tommy this, an' 
Tommy that. .'. 

ABRAHAMSON, VERNA JEANNE 

Business Course 

"Vern" hopes to be a success in 
whatever she does. Writing letters 
to a certain person seems much nicer 
to her than hearing Sinatra or doing 
homework. She likes to argue with 
Lorraine and to see a certain sailor. 
Bob Hope and the 9:20 Club are tops 
with her. She hopes to inherit a 
lot of money and to travel. Chew- 
ing gum and borrowing money are 
her worst faults. 

"A Lass that loves a sailor." 



ALESSE, SADIE MARY 

Business Course 

"Hey! What do you say?" ex- 
claims "Sa" as she dusts one of her 
souvenirs. I'd like to go to the 
movies even though I shall miss my 
favorite program, the "Lux Radio 
Theatre." She is still trying to find 
time to do all that typing. She is 
interested in office work and hopes to 
find an office job. Twice on the Honor 
Roll and captain of her gym team 
for four consecutive times, she is an . 
"all-round" girl. 

"Bright and cheery, full of fun 
Sadie's liked by everyone." 

ANDERSON. CHARLOTTE 
ELIZABETH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Charlie" wants to go to Michigan 
and be a successful housewife where 
she will probabbly serve cokes and 
vanilla ice cream. She likes bowling, 
swimming, bicycle riding and writ- 
ing letters. Here's hoping there will 
be no talkative people around or she 
will say, "Oh, gee whiz." She enjoys 
listening to Judy Canova and Sammy 
Kaye and says that her good nature 
is her best virtue. She was on the 
Varsity Bowling Team, '43 ; and 
Honor Roll, 1 and 2. 

"What sweet delight a quiet life 
affords." 

ANDERSON, WALTER HENRY 

Business Course 

"Andy" or "Slow Motion", secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Senior 
Class, hopes to coach Waltham to 
another championship after returning 
from the Navy. He is very much 
of an out-door man and likes fishing 
and skinning eels. During school he 
has been on the '43 football team, '43- 
'44 hockey and baseball teams. He 
likes walking Sunday afternoons in 
Weston and dislikes homework. 
"Tg love the game beyond the prize." 




ADAMS, MARIGOLD 

Business Course 

' v^okie ' intends to enter the Ca- 
nadian Women s Army Corps. Sne 
collects classical records and scrap- 
books of Brenda Marshall, does book- 
keeping well, and lends money, al- 
though she is sometimes late and 
loses her temper. Her activities in- 
clude hockey and basketball varsity, 
1941-1942. She dislikes Pat's saying 
"dearie" and "my lamb." Her fa- 
vorite expressions are, "All right" 
and "Hi pooh". 

"Better late than never." 



ALCOTT, WILLIAM ROHMER 

Practical Arts Course 

Since "Red" or "9-Ball" is going 
into the U. S. M'aritime Service, he 
won't have n.uch time to fulfill his 
ambition of beating Willie Hoppe 
in billiards. "Jinkies," and "Got a 
library slip?" are favorite expres- 
sions. "Red" likes all sports, especial- 
ly baseball and football. His favor- 
ite radio program is Red Skelton. His 
worst fault is borrowing money from 
Red M., although he always pays 
back. 

"If once you don't succeed, 
try, try again!" 



ALGERI, NORMA ARLENE 

College Course 

Norma's ambition is to teach after 
attending college, where she will 
probably continue collecting records 
of the latest "swoon kings." She has 
been active in the Dramatic Club, 1, 
2, 3 ; on literary staff of the Mirror, 
'3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; bowling, 1, 
2; and in archery, 1, 2. Her favorite 
program is Bob Hope. She likes 
strawberry sundaes, fried chicken, and 
Frank Sinatra. 

"They are never alone that are 
accompanied with noble thought." 



ANDERSON, DORIS MABEL 

Stenographic Course 

"Andy's" favorite expression is, 
"You can say that again!" She has 
high hopes of becoming a private 
secretary, and enjoys collecting 
stamps and records. She likes music 
and banana splits, and dislikes people 
who feel superior. Her favorite radio 
programs are Bob Hope and Bing 
Crosbv. 

"To attain the unattainable." 



ARSENAULT, BERNICE 
HARRIET 

Business Stenographic Course 
"Bunny" intends to be a private 
secretary or a stenoerapher. Her 
favorite expression is "Oh, yeh," and 
her hobby collecting pictures of movie 
stars. She likes chocolate sodas. 
Rainy weather and getting up in the 
morning are not for her, but "9:20 
Club" and the "Hit Parade" rate 
tops. Is she too slow? 

"As fresh as flowers in May." 



-Class of 1944- 



ARSENAULT, MARGARET RITA 

Business Course 

"Frerichy's" hobbies are dancing 
and collecting records. Her best 
virtue is her ability to be quiet and 
her worst fault is that she has no 
patience. "Frenchy" likes the 9:20 
Club and cherry-ring sundaes but 
dislikes wise cracks. "Oh, for good- 
ness sakes" is her favorite expression. 
She wants very much to be an office 
worker. 
"With sweetness fresh as any rose." 



BALBEN, DOROTHY MAE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dot" has the ambition to visit 
every state in the Union after work- 
ing at Graphic Microfilm Service, 
Inc. as an inspector. "Are you kid- 
din* V is heard often by this hon- 
orary member of the "W. H. H. U. 
B. Club". She cannot stand con- 
ceited high-schoolers nor cold 
weather ; but shows, frappes, and her 
favorite radio program Joan Davis 
make her smile. 

"Ambition must be made of sterner 
stuff." 



BALLANTYNE, SHIRLEY 
EVELYN 

Stenographic Course 

A favorite saying of "Shirl's" is, 
"You have your crust." She enjoys 
collecting souvenirs of places where 
she travels. She is often seen eating 
a hot fudge sundae after spending 
an evening roller skating. "Shirl" 
dislikes snobbish people. She hopes 
to hold an office position. Good luck, 
Shirl! 
"Laugh and the world laughs with 

you. 
Weep and you weep alone." 



BASLEY, LORRAINE BEVERLY 

Stenographic Course 

"Skippy" enjoys cooking, dress de- 
signing, swimming, and most of all, 
strawberries. She seems to have a 
hard time doing mathematics (I won- 
der why.) She is very musical and 
hopes to attend New England Con- 
servatory of Music. 
"Music is the universal language 
of mankind." 



BENNETT, MILDRED A. 

Teachers' College Course 

"That's what you think," is "Mil- 
lie s" favorite expression. Her am- 
bition is to enter the Cadet Nurses' 
Corps. Her hobby is keeping up the 
Navy's morale. Dancing, bowling, 
and chop suey she likes, but not 
homework or the school menu. The 
9:20 Club, Bob Hope, and Bing 
Crosby are her favorites on the radio. 
Being late is her worst fault. 
"She was made for happy thoughts." 




AUCOIN, ELISABETH MARIE 

^ ''Liz," who is often heard saying. 
"I'll hit you one," or "Hi, Sugar," 
intends to marry and raise a family 
in the country. Her hobby is col- 
lecting souvenirs from the travels of 
H. H., but only time will tell what 
her ambition is. She hates to wait 
for people, but enjoys Italian spa- 
ghetti and the 9:20 Club. Her best 
virtue is being ready to oblige. 
"Patience is a virtue." 



BALCOM, HAZEL CONSTANCE 

Stenographic Course 

"Chi-Chi" or "Hay's" favorite ex- 
pression is "Oh, Mamma." To travel 
in South America and later to settle 
down there is her ambition, but she 
expects to work in an office nearer 
home. Reading "gory mysteries" and 
collecting maps are her hobbies. She 
talks too much and hates getting up 
in the morning. She likes Allan 
Jones singing "Lady of the Lake," 
and sipping strawberry frappes. 
"She has a wealth of friendliness ; 
Although she gives freely, it never 
decreases." 



BARROWS, MARY THERESA 

Practical Arts Course 

Mary is often heard saying, "Are 
you kidding?" Her ambition is to 
travel. Reading, going to the movies, 
eating hot fudge sundaes, and listening 
to Lux Radio Theatre are some of 
her many enjoyments. She dislikes 
immensely the advertisements on the 
9 :20 Club and getting up in the 
morning. 

"Content is all." 



BAXTER, AUDREY JEAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"I'm telling you, my great ambi- 
tion is to become a fashion designer 
or illustrator" says Audrey, who 
enjoys sketching and piano playing, 
and expects to go to Hawaii, live 
on cocoanuts and pineapples, and 
meet the right one. She's just wild 
about green apples, strawberry 
frappes, and Bob Hope's program, 
but dislikes doing homework and 
narrow-minded people. She is very 
easy to live with, but talks with her 
hands too much, perhaps because she 
has been in the orchestra for three 
years. 

".'/ music be the food of love, 
play on." 

BERRY, FAYE LORRAINE 

Stenographic Course 

F'aye, one of those patriotic girls 
who want to join the Waves if the 
war isn't over by the time they'!c 
twenty, is often heard saying, "Are 
vou kidding"?" She enjoys writing 
letters, dancing, sports, and good 
movies although her lubby is collect- 
ing photos (when she can get films.) 
She is stubborn and dislikes home- 
work, but she can get along with 
anybody who. can get along with her. 

"Where did you net your eyes 
so blue?" 






BERRY, MILDRED LOUISE 

.Practical Arts Course 

"Millie" or "Half-pint" is always 
sure to say, "Oh! so!" and "Sharp- 
ie." She always listens to Lux Radio 
Program and the 9 :20 Club and likes 
a certain G. . . . Borrowing money 
from "Dad" is a fault but being on 
time a virtue. To be a success in 
whatever she does and to work and 
save money to travel in the United 
States is her ambition. She enjoys 
going to the movies and avoids "cat- 
ty" girls. 

"All good things come in small 
packages." 



BLUNT, ELNA LORRAINE 

Stenographic Course 

"Rainy" is often seen arguing with 
Verna. She enjoys writing letters 
overseas to a certain some one. 
(Could we have a guess?) She has 
a wonderful sense of humor and often 
talks with her hands. "No kidding?" 
or "Come on, Mun" are her favorite 
expressions. She hopes to be a suc- 
cess and in her old age to travel 
around the world. 

"Women are wiser . . . 



BREMNER, MURIEL ELLEN 

College Course 

Muriel, whose expression is "Great 
Caesar's Ghost!" hopes to graduate 
from Boston University and to join 
the SPARS. Her favorite radio pro- 
gram is Henry Aldrich. She day- 
dreams and talks too fast, but these 
faults did not prevent her from mak- 
ing the Honor Roll in her Junior 
and Senior years. She has been in 
basketball and was a Class Day 
usher. She likes spending summers 
at Maine beaches, but dislikes writing 
letters and compositions. 

"Inspiration and genius, one and 
the same." 



BRUCE, ROBERT FRENCH 

College Course 

If one hears a young man asking 
"What's cooking?" he knows it's 
"Brucie," who desires to see the world, 
after graduating from Northeastern. 
He was assistant editor of the Mirror, 
'42-43 ; Co-editor, '43-'44 ; a member 
of the Senior Dance Committee, '44, 
and a member of the Senior Play 
Committee; and on Honor Roll. 1-2- 
3-4. Although he is sometimes indis- 
creet, he redeems himself by always 
being punctual. Drinking cokes and 
listening to the "Cowboy Jamboree" 
take up his spare time. 

"Up/ up f my friend and quit 
your books." 

BURGESS. DORIS MARIE 

Business Accounting Course 
Blondie's ambition is to become a 
secretary to a criminal lawyer though 
she says her destination is to get a 
job in a war plant and go to night 
school. She likes bicycle riding and 
hot fudge sundaes, but dislikes 
Frank Sinatra and conceited people. 
Her favorite radio program is Lux 
Radio Theatre ; her worst fault, be- 
ing late. Her most-used expression 
is "Hey, Cactus Head!" 

"A woman's hair is her crowning 



glory," 




- 1 BISHOP, JUANITA RUTH 

I Stenographic Course 

"Are you kidding?" asks good- 

■ natured "Deeta" while searching for 
a new shade of lipstick tor her col- 

■ lection. She hopes to become a nurse 
or a medical stenographer. Her dis- 
like of getting up early in the morn- 
ing is second only to her dislike of 
Irank Sinatra. Ushing and the color 
biue are her special likes. If you 
want to find "Ueeta" while "Abie's 
Irish Rose" is on the air, look for 
her by the radio. 
"Maidens' hearts are always soft." 



BRADFORD, JOYCE M\ 

Stenographic Course 
<( "Joy's favorite expressions are, 
"How de do de" and "Hurry up, 
Joan." She plans to go to Hawaii 
to keep up with her hobbies, bowling, 
movies, and photography. She likes 
Irank Sinatra, Sunday afternoons, 
milk shakes in Dandy Dutch after 
school with Joan, writing letters, and 
listening to Bob Hope and Bob 
Crosby but dislikes bookkeeping and 
waiting for people. She doesn't do 
her homework. Her activities are 
Dramatic Club, 42-44; Archery, 42; 
Usher at Parent-Teacher's Night, 42- 
43, and Mirror Room Agent, 43-44. 
"My heart leaps up when I behold 
Joyce coming nigh." 



BROWN, ELEANOR ROSE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Honey's" favorite expression is, 
"Oh, I like that!" Her ambition 
is to have an all-girl orchestra, and 
her hobby is collecting Harry James's 
records. She hopes to go to both 
Ireland and Hollywood. Her school 
activities were in the Dramatic Club, 
1942-43; and being a drum majorette, 
1941-42-43. "Honey" likes sipping 
vanilla frappes with B. M. 

"What's in a name?" 



BUCKLEY, MARY ELIZABETH 

Business Course 

"Bucky's" favorite expression is, 
"Yea, Winthrop! Don't get lost." 
Her ambitions are going on the stage 
and moving to Winthrop. Collecting 
clippings and pictures for her scrap 
book is her favorite hobby. Base- 
ball and archery are her' activities. 
She likes to criticize Frank Sinatra, 
(Who doesn't?), to have English in 
015, and to listen to the 9:20 Club. 
Her worst fault is arguing. 

"As high as my heart." 



CARTER, BARBARA ALBERTA 

Teachers' College Course 

"Barbie" is often heard to say 
"Oh, heck" as she goes around with 
stars in her eyes thinking of the 
Marines. Although she hopes to 
travel, she wants to become a Cadet 
Nurse after graduation. Her major 
activity is basketball. She likes to 
listen to Bing Crosby, (but dislikes 
writing up Lab. experiments. If she 
is seen near Teddy T., you can imag- 
ine she is telling him what she 
thinks of him. 
"A thing of beauty is a joy forever," 



„__ M *« M _ MWMM _o« M Class of 1944 ►"— • *— >*-<> 



CASS, MERVIN ELWYN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Sho NurF," says Merv. "I hope 
to own a cattle farm and become a 
rival of Frank Sinatra some day." 
Merv is fond of boxing and wrestl- 
ing and is ready to fight at a mo- 
ment's notice. His outside activities 
mostly concern a redhead in Newton. 
He believes that politeness is th best 
way to make friends, and he seems 
to have followed his own advice. He 
dislikes all wild women and war. 

"The age vf chivalry is past." 



CHIASSON, YVONNE 

Stenographic Course 

"Vonnie" is headed for an office 
where she hopes to be a successful 
secretary. She says "Shucks" and 
"Are you kidding?" She likes writ- 
ing letters, collecting records, read- 
ing books, and hearing the Youth 
Parade program and Harry James. 

"Under the fallen blossom 

Is a letter I have hid." 



CHUTE, DONALD READ 

Practical Arts Course 

"Wait a minute," yells "Chutie" 
as he rushes to a hockey game to en- 
joy one of his favorite sports. What 
is he humming after he has listened 
to Red Skelton, Fibber McGee and 
Molly, or Can You Top _ This? 
Room agent for the Mirror 'in '42. 
He wants to earn a living and keep 
ahead of taxes in spite of math 
tests. Always on time for recordings 
and other interesting things, he will 
certainly get his good job. 
"It is a silly game where nobody 
wins." 



COBB, JOHN LINCOLN 
College Course 

Our Assistant Art Editor, '42-'43, 
and Art Editor, '44, will take his 
hobbies of drawing, stamp collecting, 
and baseball pictures to college, 
where he will keep up his interest 
in vanilla milk shakes, the Brooklyn 
Dodgers, Bob Hope, Fred Allen, and 
Xavier Cugat. If Eugene Clark is 
near, he will supply Eugene with ice- 
cream, that is if he isn't too late 
to get any. Cobbie hopes to be a 
ssefond Gene Mack. 
"But each for the joy of working, 

and each, in his separate star. 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees 

it .... " 

COLLETTO, JOSEPH SULLY 

Technical Course 

If you see a sharp green "convert- 
ible" laboring down the street, you 
can bet Joe is in it shouting, "What 
can you do?" His many activities 
include band, 1-2; football, 1-2-3; 
Sophomore Social Committee ; Junior 
Prom Committee ; and President of 
IV B Club in Charge of War Ra- 
tions (gas and shoe stamps, a spec- 
ialty.) He doesn't like catty women 
and coaxing his car on cold morn- 
ings. 

"A smile for all, a welcome glad, 
A jovial coaxing way he had," 




CAVOOTO. GEMMA THERESA 

Practical Arts Course 

"You said it" or "Isn't that cute!" 
may be heard from Emma who col- 
lects postcards and pictures of movie 
stars and hopes to secure a good de- 
fense job after graduation. Sundaes, 
candy, and movies are tops with her, 
but not oral compositions and con- 
ceited people. She is always present 
and punctual. 
"Friends are like melons. Shall I tell 

you why? 
To find a good one you must a 
hundred try." 



CHISHOLM, RICHARD ELMER 

Business Course 

"Lanky's" ambition is to meet his 
favorite comical gangsster, "Flat 
Top" ; his favorite expression is 
"Good Egg" ; his hobby is picking 
on "Rody" in gym. He expects to 
be President of Warrendale A. C. 
The Sophomore, Junior and Senior 
Nominating Committees were honored 
with his membership. His favorite 
radio program is Ma Perkins. Is it 
a fault to lend money? 
"Good qualities often come in small 
packages." 



CLARK, EUGENE RAYMOND, 
JR. 

College Course 

"Gene" or "Clarkie" expects to go 
to college as a Naval V-5 Cadet. 
He may often be heard saying, 
"Well, it has possibilities." Busy 
with Football, '42-'43 ; Basketball, 
'43-'44; and Honor Roll, '42-'43 ; he 
also likes dancing, movies, all sports, 
Lux Radio Theatre, and trying to 
sing like Sinatra, but dislikes silly 
girls. Borrowing money, his worst 
fault, is redeemed by his ability to 
restrain Cobb when blondes pass by. 
"Once more upon the waters! 
Yet once more!" 



COLE, LAWRENCE WEBBER 

Practical Arts Course 

If you hear, "How's it goin'?" 
you'll probably find Larry tapping 
his pencil on the desk. The Naval 
Air Corps is just the place for him, 
even though he won't be able to col- 
lect more flashy ties. People who 
can't take a joke annoy him because 
he enjoys his own jokes. 

"Many strange birds are on the 
air abroad." 



COLLINS, PHYLLIS ANNE 

Business Course 

"Oh, Man!" says Phyl as you 
see her chewing gum. Her hobby is 
writing letters (To anyone special, 
Phyl?) She dislikes homework but 
likes the 9:20 Club. She wants to 
take a nice long trip and forget to 
return. 
"She walks in beauty like the night." 






COLLURA, PETER 

Stenographic Course 

"Shorty," who is now in the. navy, 
likes to take walks with a certain 
T. B. from Newton. ' He enjoys eat- 
ing sundaes in Candyland on Satur- 
day nights. Since he is shy and re- 
tiring, he likes to listen to soothing 
music. Shall we address him as 
"Admiral Pete" in the future? 
"Silence is the element m which 
great things fashion themselves." 



CORKUM, JUNE ARDELE 

Business Accounting Course 
"Whatcha doin?" asks "Red" 
who hates to be called "Carrot Top." 
She wants to be a good office worker 
but will have to correct her fault of 
being late for everything. She col- 
lects a certain person's letters and 
hopes to go to Vermont after the 
war with G. E. B. and forget to 
come back. 

"// / could write the beauty of 
your eyes." 



COUSINS, ANNE BEVERLY 

Teachers' College Course 

Good natured Bev, who is always 
chewing gum or whistling, likes rid- 
ing her horse "Aristocrat." and the 
cold shower in Gym, although she 
dislikes girls who comb their hair in 
"Caf." Her ambition is to be a 
stewardess via Nurses' Training. She 
has participated in all sports; and was 
on Sophomore Nominating Committee, 
Honor Roll, and Dramatic Club. 
'Boot, saddle, to horse, and away." 



CULLEN, ALISCA 

College Course 

Boston University will probably 
see "Al" preparing to teach English 
in China. She enjoys dancing, 
sports, frappes, working at Johnson's, 
and English. "My word!" she says 
as she begins arguing with anyone 
in sight. Her activities include 
Sports, 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary of the 
Dramatic Club, 4 ; Girls' Sports 
Editor, 4; Dramatic Club plays 3, 4; 
and Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3, 4. She does 
not like poor sports and has no 
special "MAN"erism. Class Poet '44. 
"She'll play a small game rather 
than stand out." 

D'ANGIO, FLORA 

Special Course 

If you hear, "Are you kidding?" 
it might be Flo, whose ambition is 
to travel. Her hobbies are reading 
and writing letters. Her activities 
include Business Manager of the 
Mirror and Dramatic Club '43 and 
'44. Her favorite program is the 
Hit Parade, while lending money (to 
whom?) is her best virtue. Chew- 
ing gum and biting her fingernails 
are her worst faults. 

"flora's wit sure makes a hit." 




CORCORAN, FRANCIS BER- 
NARD 

Civic Course 

"Zero," "Stretch," or "Bud" wants 
to be a golf professional and go 
south with Bob Lally to play in tne 
big time circuits with Terry M'cGov- 
ern and to carry doubles for them. 
He thrills at beating Lally in golf. 
"Bud's" hobby is looking for golf 
balls and walking up and down Moody 
Street. He dislikes blonds and red- 
heads and also working, but likes a 
dish of beans drowned in ketchup, 
and "Spike" Jones. He played 
hockey 2, 3, and 4, and golf 3, 4. 
He is often heard saying "He's ba- 
nanas." Mirror room agent 4. 
"At the game's end, we shall 
see who gains." 

COSTA, CARMELLA CLARA 

Stenographic Course 

"Mela," smiling at you says, "Not 
really!" This agreeable girl likes 
to sing, dance, swim, and make new 
friends. She enjoys football. Harry 
James, and hockey games. Her hob- 
by is playing the piano. She wants 
to travel and to become a medical 
secretary. Don't lose your temper 
then, "M'ela." 

"The hand that hath made you fair 
hath made you good." 



CROCKER, JEANNE MARIE 

Clerical Course 

"Isn't he cute!" says Scottie, who 
hopes to join the Waves or Spars 
and who wants to take a cruise to 
South America. She likes bowling 
and skating, and also enjoys dancing 
with C. S. She is always smiling, 
talking, and being late for classes, 
but is annoyed by anonymous phone 
calls. 

"Our safety is in our speed." 



DAGOSTINO, LENA ROSE 

Business Course 

Lil always can be heard saying 
"Pretty sharp." Her ambition is to 
enter the musical world, but in the 
meantime she intends to work in an 
office and travel through the United 
States. She likes friendly people, 
bowling, sports and the 9 :20 Club. 
Her worst fault is being late but 
her virtue, being nice to people, 
makes up for this. 

"The sincere alone can recognize 
sincerity." 



DEFINA, ELEANOR JEAN 

Practical Arts Course 
Driving around the United States 
in a new Buick after the war, 
"Giggles" will enjoy dancing, hot 
fudge sundaes, chocolate sodas, and 
the company of a certain "S." 
"Laugh and the world laughs 
with you." 






DEFINO, ANGELINA N. 

Stenographic Course 

To be a success in business with 
dancing on the sidelines is "Lee's" 
ambition and hobby. Does getting 
up in the morning, one of her few 
dislikes, mean anything? Everything 
is evened by her best virtue of al- 
ways smiling. She likes hot fudge 
sundaes and the 9:20 Club, but dis- 
likes pickles and girls whistling. 
"Love is the only chatter. 
Friends are all that matter." 



DELANEY, MARY MAY 

Business Course 

Mary wants to work in an office 
or to join the Waves. One of her 
hobbies is writing to a "certain some- 
one", and another is collecting records 
of cowboy songs. She likes lemon 
pie and going to town with the 
"gang." She calls blushing her worst 
fault. She always keeps her promises. 

"... fondly called the smiling 
maid." 



DEMEO. JENNIFER B. 

Business Course 

"Jen" or "Jenny." whose ambition 
is Nurses' Training, wants to own 
a trailer and to travel. Her favorite 
exDressions are "Really," "Good- 
ness." and "Oh dear." She likes 
writing letters, driving, and dancing. 
Bing Crosby is her favorite singer. 
She gets along with others, but she 
is persuaded too easily, and talks in 
class to B. F. „ 

"Drink to me only with thine eyes. 



DESISTO, ALICE ANNE 

Stenographic Course 

"Honey" with her "sunny dispo- 
sition" and quiet winning way will 
surely attain her ambition to work 
in the Senior High School Office. As 
an ardent fan of Jimmy Dorsey, she 
spends her spare time listening to 
the 9:20 Club. When you hear 
"What do you know. Joe?" you'll 
know that she is near. Good luck, 
Alice ! 
"Success, remember, is the reward 
of toil." 



DOL'CETTE. DORIS MAY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dodo's" favorite expression is 
"Kinda cute." Her ambition is to 
be an interior decorator. Don't you 
think she'll make a good one, girls'? 
Collecting pennies and coins is her 
hobby. She likes cats, cherry-top 
sundaes, and a certain W. A. ; but 
dislikes conceited people and fish. 
Her favorite radio program is Mary 
Noble, Backstage Wife." Getting 
angry too easily is her worst fault. 
"She that in a neat house will 
dwell." 




DELANEY, EDNA M: 

Stenographic Course 

"Eddie" or "Winkie" has no 
special ambition. She often questions 
her friends with "Are you kiddin'?" 
Harry James and record programs 
that continue practically all day are 
her likes, while riding in busses, 
getting up in the morning, and home- 
work are her dislikes. Although she 
expects to work in an office, right 
now collecting unusual pins is her 
hobby. Borrowing money is her worst 
fault, but her best virtue is a good 
disposition. 
"To sing and dance is her delight." 



DEMEO, ANGELA 

Stenographic Course 

"Angie's" ambition is to grow one 
more inch. She likes to collect snap- 
shots of friends. After the war she 
wants to travel around the country 
in a trailer. She dislikes people who 
are late, as she is punctual herself. 
She likes all forms of chocolate. 
"/ am wealthy in my friends." 



DEMEO, MARGARET MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"Mickey" is often kidded with the 
name "Glamour Pants." Her fa- 
vorite expression is "Oh Brother." 
To be a success, while working as 
a stenographer in a furniture store, 
is her ambition. Dancing and sing- 
ing, eating chocolate frappes, and 
listening to Glenn Miller, the Lux 
Radio Theatre, and the 9:20 Club 
seem good to her. She frankly says 
that homework and getting up in 
the morning are strictly distasteful. 
but she keeps on smiling. 
"Five feet five with a line of jive." 



DEVANE, MARGARET L. 

Stenographic Course 

"Marge," former business manager 
of the Mirror, can be heard saying, 
"Are you kiddin'?" Her best and 
worst virtues respectively are getting 
up when called and eating too much. 
Playing the piano with one finger 
and writing letters are her hobbies. 
She also enjoys the 9:20 Club, but 
definitely not Frank Sinatra. Marge 
plans to work in an office. She likes 
hot fudge sundaes, but dislikes dom- 
ineering juniors. 

"/ should like to rise and go 
Where the golden apples go." 



DOUCETTE. MARGARET 
DOROTHY 

Business Course 

"Peggy's" favorite expressions 
"Murder!" and "Hi, ya, kid!" 
loves dancing, listening to the 



are, 

She 

Hit 

sports. 



Parade, bicycle riding, and 
She hopes to join the Waves. 
"Let. us live, then, and be glad." 



„-„-„« — ,«, — _ — Class of 1944- — 



DOUGLAS. LORETTA 
MARGARET 

Practical Arts Course 

Dougie's or "Dodo's" problem is 
whether to be a cadet nurse or a 
hairdresser. Who knows? The girl 
in the snappy-looking uniform who 
calls out "Hi, Hon" may be a few 
years from now our Dodo. She's in- 
terested in bowling and the Dramatic 
Club, likes dancing, swimming, and 
skating, and dislikes catty girls and 
conceited boys. Her favorite radio 
program is Big Town. Not doing 
homework is her worst fault — a 
common one. 

"Those curious locks so aptly 
twin d." 



DUGAS, LAURETTE ESTHER 

Business Course 

"Ye Gods and little fishes,'' or 
"Duggy" or "Brighteyes," announces 
Esther's presence. Her ambition is 
to be a social worker. She tap- 
dances at camps for the boys- in the 
service as a hobby. The Dramatic 
Club, plays, music, and sports take 
up her time. 

"Good things come in small 
packages." 



EATON, MARY ELAINE 

Stenographic Course 

"Mim" would like to be a success 
in anything she attempts, preferably 
as a private secretary. "That's all 
I need," as she would say. She has 
been on the Sophomore Nominating 
and Social Committees, the Junior 
Nominating Committee, Senior Play 
Committee and the Honor Roll. Be- 
lieve it or not, her best virtue is 
being on time, (Where's that sailor?) 
"Her face, betokens all things dear 
and good." 



ELLIOT. WILFRED FRANKLIN 

Business Course 

"Bill" would like to be an ac- 
countant, but his immediate plans are 
unknown, on land, sea, or in the air. 
He has many hobbies but no partic- 
ular one unless it's eating everything 
except liver and sauerkraut. Of 
course, he can't stand "Swoonatra," 
the only radio program he doesn't 
listen to. Oh. yes, he is able to 
shave without cutting himself. 
"Gentler than May and pleasanter 
than rhyme." 



EVANGELISTA. THERESA 
MARY 

Business Machines Course 
If you should ask "Dee-Dee" 
where she met all the people whom 
she lavishes her smiles on, she'd re- 
ply, "Oh, they go to Waltham 
High." New York is her destination 
to earn a much needed vacation, after 
which, she'd like to join the Waves. 
"Eye lights eye in good friendship." 




DRURY, PAUL JOSEPH 

i ecnnical c ourse 

"loo Bad!' says "Droopy ", who ex- 
pects to go to M. I. 1 . and become 
an engineer. ±iis tavontes on tne 
radio are JJufty s '1 avern and Bing 
Crosby. Conduct marks in 113 are 
his worst fault, while taking care of 
Mac is his best virtue. flis activi- 
ties include .Honor ftoll, 1-2; Presi- 
dent of IV B Club. 
' He's independent and never blue." 



DUNBRACK, HAZEL 
MAAGUEKITE 

business Course 

If you happen to hear, "Come on! 
Lets go!" look for cheerful little 
Hazel, the class auditor, '44. Her 
object in life is to be an accurate 
typist, but as far as her line of work, 
only time will tell. She played field 
hockey in '42. She likes to collect 
cards from B. M. A few of her dis- 
likes are opening doors and waiting 
for Mai. She is always happy but 
can't seem to save money. The 9:20 
Club is definitely on her list. 

"Besides being funny she's really 
a honey." 



ELLET, HAZEL DOROTHY 

College Course 

"Harshoe" is a little girl, but just 
try to miss her. Bowling, drawing, 
and photography are her avocations, 
and with all her Honor Roll marks 
her ambition is to join the Cadet 
Nurse Corps. "Lucky" says a bad 
temper is her worst fault. Frankly, 
in three years we've yet to see it. 
"A soul sincere, in action faithful, 
and in honor clear." 



ELORETT, LORRAINE 
MARGARET 

Business Course 

"What's the matter?" Penny will 
ask, hers being a naturally kind 
nature. She would like to join 
the Waves (with Bea) or to go to 
New York, (also with Bea). Her 
hobby is writing to the Navy. Straw- 
berry ice-cream, and a certain blonde 
(t). W.) never fail to delight her. 
She is undecided as to her worst 
fault, but has a good time. 
"There lies your way, due west." 



EVERETT, ROBERT PAUL 

Civic Course 

Although "Bob's" destination is 
probably the Army, he is apt to be- 
come a store manager after all the 
experience he has had working in a 
grocery store after school. Perhaps 
he will find enough cash in his busi- 
ness to see the world even after he 
leaves the Army. "Bob" is never 
heard saying "Gee" or "Gosh" while 
listening to Inner Sanctum, his fav- 
orite radio program or when hunting, 
fishing, or collecting stamps, but just 
mention Frank Sinatra and — 
"Golden hair, like sunlight 
streaming" 






ERICKSON, IRENE EDITH 

practical Arts Course 

"Eric s" ambition is to be in a 
good orchestra where she will play 
tne piano. Sne likes C. if.'s twenty- 
tour hour passes, irrankie Carles 
piano playing, dancing, and straw- 
berry trappes with t. . Y., but she 
dislikes t rank Sinatra. Never being 
at nome is her worst fault, which ac- 
counts tor fter not having a care in 
tne world. You will see her eating M. 
and M.'s and peanuts in Room 311 
with barbs. "Ya' and "Twice on 
Sunday" are her favorite expressions. 
Her destination is Massachusetts Art. 
A member of the IJramatic Club in 
1941. 

"Music hath charms." 

IERGUSON. BEATRICE MARIE 

business Course 

"Arc you kidding ?" is Bea's fa- 
mous line. To own or live on a 
chicken farm is her idea of heaven. 
She intends to join the WAVES. 
She enjoys dancing, Sinatra, and tall 
Marines. She laughs and is very 
cneerful. 

"Mild jokes that never wounded but 
had charm." 



FLOOD. FRANK JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

Activities : Band. 6 years : North 
Junior Alumni Committee; Basket- 
ball, '42, '43. Folks call him "Maes- 
tro" as he wants to play in a big 
name band after he finishes with the 
Marine Corp. His favorite pieces are 
"Stardust," "Where or When," and 
"Night and Day". He likes "Tote," 
little children, Miss Allen, and a. cer- 
tain girl in a green sweater. He is 
said to be stubborn ; to dislike 
writing letters and girls who talk too 
much. 

"His knowledge hid from public 
gaze." 



FOLEY, EMMA E. 

Teachers' College Course 

"If you hear "Hurry up, Mary," 
it's sure to be Blondie, who Dlans to 
enter the Nurses' Cadet Corps. She 
dislikes intellectual sisters and oral 
book reports. Blondie is a great one 
for bowling and writing letters. Too 
bad she can't conquer that bad habit 
of biting her nails. 

"A violet by a mossy stone." 



FRANK, ERIC H., JR. 

Snccial Course 

"Well, what do you know?" says 
Bud as he ardently listens to Red 
Skelton. He expects to go to col- 
lege after graduation and then to be- 
come an office worker. Bud is said 
to be gullible, and he doesn't like 
classmates who don't know when to 
be quiet. Member of the band, 1, 
2, 3. 4 ; and Hockey Squad, 4. 
"To love the game beyond the 
prize." 




FAVRE, ESTHER 

Stenographic Course 

If you hear someone exclaim, 
"Good gravy!" look for "Speed," the 
future secretary of the Boys' Club 
of Waltham. She enjoys collecting 
stamps and coins, good movies, good 
music, and hot fudge sundaes. Suc- 
cess in life is her chief ambition. 
"Let us then be up and doing." 



FISHEB, MARY-LOU 

Special Course 

Oh, Mary-Lou (of the unmention- 
able nickname) is often heard saying, 
"How about that!" She plans to at- 
tend Colby Junior College and has 
been quite active in bowling, oper- 
ettas, and basketball. She also has 
been Mirror room agent. She likes 
the Totem Pole and the Lone Ranger 
but dislikes first-period gym classes. 
Her worst fault is talking too much 
and getting angry for no reason. 
"Thou hast wit at will." 



FLORIO, AMELIO JOSEPH 

Business Course 

"Curly" hopes to be Certified Pub- 
lic Accountant. However, his Draft 
Board could tell you more about his 
immediate destination. Football, bowl- 
ing, and swimming are among his 
many activities. Bob Hope, women, 
and music are his idea of what makes 
the world go round. "The wrong 
kind of English," can always be 
heard when this lad is around. 
"A little with quiet is the only 
diet." 



FOLEY, PATRICIA G. 

Business Course 

Having fun is "Pat's" hobby and 
"Oh, gosh!" is her favorite expres- 
sion. She exDects to beecome a ste- 
nographer and a great success in life. 
The 9 :20 Club is her favorite radio 
program while she likes eating all the 
time and the color blue. Being good- 
natured and smiling are "Pat's" 
best virtues. 

"Gracious, happy, ever pleasing" 



FRANKLIN, GEORGE 

Snecial Course 

"Ben" or "Frankie" is a member 
of the Waltham High Band, 1, 2, 3. 
4, which might account for his want- 
ing to play sax with Benny Good- 
man. He mav often be heard saying. 
"That ain't bad," or "Hi, ya. Bud." 
He likes Duffy's Tavern and tall 
blonds with long hair. His worst 
fault is listening to E. F., Jr. His 
destination is Miami University of 
Music, although it may turn out to 
be Tokyo. 
"Music is the medicine of the mind." 



,-,_,,-,,-, ~,,_„_,,_,,~,_.,<Class of 1944 



FREEMAN. JAMES ROBERT 

Practical Arts Course 

If you hear "Hey, that ain't bad'' 
or "Hello, there!" look for "Jimmie" 
who wants to join the Navy and see 
the world. "Lefty" was active on 
the baseball team, 3, 4. He likes to 
dance, to collect Varga Girl pictures, 
and to listen to Bob Hope and Red 
Skelton. He prides himself in get- 
ting along well with people. 
"Roll on thou dark blue ocean, roll." 



FULLERTON, BARBARA IRENE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bobbie" or "Barb" would like to 
go to Wilfred Academy and then 
travel, writing letters and playing 
the piano whenever an occasion arises. 
"Hey, Eric, got my lunch?" she 
shouts, before eating peanuts in 
Room 311. Too bad there are no 
hot fudge sundaes in the lunch room. 
She dislikes getting up early, and 
meeting snobbish girls, but she thinks 
Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, and skating 
are tops. Stubborn, but on time. 
"You said so little that I had to 

guess 

The thought that lay behind those 

steady eyes." 

GEOFFRION, JULIA THERESA 

Stenographic Course 

Julia, who was on the Junior 
Nominating Committee and a member 
of the "S. D. S." wants to be a 
successful secretary and to travel. 
Skating, bicycling, the Great Gilder- 
sleeve, and the 9:20 Club are high in 
her estimation, as are sewing, draw- 
ing and piano playing. We regret 
that Julia is unable to graduate with 
us, but we are glad to have her in 
our book. 
"Absent in person, but present in 
spirit." 

GILES, SHIRLEY ANNA 

Teachers' College Course 

"Shirl" will soon be among the 
ranks of Florence Nightingale, if 
she has her way. She expects to go 
in training at the Children's Hospi- 
tal. "Oh, brother," she shouts when 
excited, as when she burns her hand 
with H-2 SO-4 in the lab. She likes 
the 9:20 Club. Bob Hope, and Bing 
Crosby, and has a sense of humor. 
"A merry heart goes all the way." 



GODFREY, MARGARET 
ELEANOR 

Stenographic Course 

If Peggy were asked whether she 
likes the Navy, she would probably 
reply with her favorite expression, 
"Definitely" because her ambition is 
to join the Cadet Nurses and become 
a Navy nurse. She claims her worst 
faults are borrowing money from her 
parents and leaving everything till 
the last minute. She enjoys hot 
fudge sundaes, meeting Lorraine or 
Jennie, the 9:20 Club and Grand 
Ole Opry. but dislikes staying in 
Friday and Saturday nights. 

"The music of the laughing lip, 

(he luster of the eye." 




FREEMAN, LOIS 

Special Course 

It you hear someone asking "Won- 
der if 1 got any mail today Y" you 11 
know it's "Lo" or "Cuddles." Since 
she wants to become a nurse, she 
hopes to enter Massachusetts Genera] 
Hospital. Writing letters to a certain 
someone is her hobby. She was on 
the Senior Nominating Committee and 
Honor Roll 1 and 2. She enjoys 
Allan Ladd, coffee ice-cream and the 
9:20 Club. Although stubborn she 
helps other people. Don't call her 
"fat." 

"She is pretty to walk with 
And witty to talk with." 



GARRIGAN, JUNE MARIE 

Business Course 

This easy-going young lady can be 
usually identified by her characteris- 
tic remark, "Will you hang up!" She 
likes music, tall Marines, and Bob 
Hope, but not getting lunches and 
doing homework. She hopes to be suc- 
cessful as a WAVE or Cadet Nurse. 
Her hobby! mmm, writing to that 
certain person. 

"As idle as a painted ship 
Upon a painted ocean." 



GIAMO, JOSEPH JOHN 

Stenographic Course 

"That ain't bad, Howie," says 
"Shoulders," a good-natured boy who 
wants to become president of the 
Potter Press. On the Senior Nomi- 
nating Committee ; the Mirror Busi- 
ness Staff, '44; and the City 
League Basketball Team, he enjoys 
taking an automobile apart to see 
ing and dislikes talkative dames, 
what makes it tick. He likes sleep- 
The Inner Sanctum is his favorite 
radio program, and not doing his 
homework is his worst fault. 
"Towering to the height of sixty- 
eight inches 
He is a boy who never flinches." 

GISIGER, MILDRED MARIE 

College Course 

"Milly" spends her spare time 
reading and listening to the radio, 
perhaps sippine some of her two 
quarts of milk a day at the 
same time. She likes tennis and 
skating, and belongs to the Dramatic 
Club. On graduating from high 
school "Milly" will attend college 
and later become a history teacher. 
Her favorite exDression is "You're 
cute," and her best virtue, laughing 
things off. 

"Laugh and be well." 



GORGONE. VIRGINIA LOUISE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jinny," who is always saying 
"That ain't bad," hopes to help 
Uncle Sam by someday joining U. S. 
Cadet Nurse Corps. She has been a 
member of the Dramatic Club and 
likes outdoor sports, roller skating, 
the 9 :20 Club, and Bob Hope, but 
dislikes red ink en report cards. 
Breaking appointments with "Dodo" 
is her worst fault, while being kind 
to dumb people is her best virtue. 
"The play's the thing," 






GORMLEY, JAMES LAWRENCE 

Practical Arts Course • 

Although "Jimmie " wants to be- 
come a mechanical engineer, he ex- 
pects to join the Coast (juard or the 
Navy. Whenever he isn't bowling 
or roller-skating, he makes it a point 
to be home on time for I Love a 
Mystery. He says his worst fault 
is getting girls home too early, and 
his best virtue is not associating with 
too many girls. You're on the right 
track, "Jimmie". Wc are wondering 
whether he says, "Are you kidding?" 
to all his girl friends. 
"Plough the fields and scatter the 
good seed over the land." 

GRANT. NORMA ARLENE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Cookie" may be frequently heard 
saying, "That ain't bad." She wants 
to travel after the war and to attend 
Massachusetts School of Art. She 
collects pictures and letters, eats hot 
fudge sundaes, listens to Bing Crosby 
and Bob Hope, and is interested in 
a certain sailor. She dislikes snobby 
people and Frank Sinatra. Her best 
virtue is being on time. 
"Where e're my steps may wander." 



GUINEY, ROBERT JAMES 

Business Course 

If you bump into a handsome 
blonde on the first floor asking, 
"Where's Shea*" you may be sure 
it's Bob, who intends to be a Naval 
Aviation Cadet and wear the Navy's 
gold wings. He dislikes women- 
drivers and the ingenious combina- 
tions served in the cafe. Listening 
to Shea's chatter with patience is his 
special virtue. 
"Ihrougk the clear skies of March." 



HAND, RUTH ELIZABETH 

College Course 

After leaving high school, Ruthie 
expects to go to a teachers' college. 
Child care is her ambition. "How's 
it going*" and "Not bad!" are her 
common expressions. Her hobby is 
a military secret. Bing Crosby and 
receiving letters rate high with her, 
but answering the letters and work- 
ing rate much lower. 

"Quiet as a street . . . ' 



HATFIELD. GEORGE WILFRED 

Practical Arts Course 

To be an optician is "Budd's" am- 
bition after he has bombed Tokyo. 
"I'm not as dumb as you look," is 
his favorite expression. Among his 
activities are arguing when not eat- 
ins an ice cream float, listening to the 
'Hour of Charm" playing hockey, or 
traveling to Newton Centre. "Now 
don't argue, "Buddo!" You don't 
like to work. 

"Look into my eye." 




GRAHAM, EMILY LYDIA 

College Course 

"Em, ' whose hobby is music, wants 
to be a journalist. "Oh, Christmas" 
is her favorite expression, and pa- 
tience her best virtue. Her activities 
include the Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 ; 
bowling team, 1, 2; and archery 1, 
2, 3. She enjoys eating and listen- 
ing to Phil Spitalny. 

'The music in my heart I bore." 



GREENWAY, GEORGE GRAY 

Civic Course 

"The Deacon" intends to remain 
a bachelor, even though he is often 
heard saying, "That ain't bad!" 
However, "that" might refer to his 
hobby, music. His destination is un- 
doubtedly the Army. George was 
hockey manager, 42-43 and 43-44 and 
a member of the Dramatic Club 42- 
43. His worst fault, telling corny 
jokes, does not hinder his cheerful 
personality. His favorite pastime is 
listening to Fred Waring while sip- 
ping a lemon coke. He dislikes 
Frank Sinatra and talkative girls. 
"/ am the captain of my soul." 



HAMM', ESTHER MAY 

Business Course 

"Es" or "Peanut" to her friends, 
will reply, "Oh Heavens," to near- 
ly everything. Her ambition is to 
graduate but when that's done, "Who 
knows?" she asks. She collects 
"doodads," and likes swimming, danc- 
ing and hot fudge sundaes. The In- 
ner Sanctum keeps her in a dither. 
She is always on time. 

"Just as high as my heart." 



HARVEY, FRANCES MARIE 

College Course 

"Frannie," a future member of the 
U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps, wants to 
travel. At present, however, she 
busies herself with movies on Satur- 
day nights, listening to Ginny Simms, 
eating hot fudge sundaes with Laurie, 
and writing letters. She dislikes late 
people, although she will patiently 
wait for them while munching her 
fingernails. 

"How does your patient, nurse?" 



HAYDEN, RUTH ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course . 

"Ruthie's" ambition is to join the 
Cadet Nurse Corps. Her hobbies are 
reading and studying about the Navy, 
and she likes going to the R. K. O. 
with her friend Olga. She despises 
second lunch on Wednesday ! Her 
favorite program is Bob Hope. She 
is quiet. 

"Her heart is like an outbound ship 
That at its anchor swings." 



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HAYNES, LAURIE VIRGINIA 

Teachers' College Course 

The click of high heels, a swirl of 
a fashionable skirt, a cheery "Hel- 
lo!" and it's Laurie. She makes a 
Powers' model look positively dowdy. 
Driving, clothes, and writing to a 
certain person in the RCAF arc 
Laurie's hobbies. Lux Radio Theatre 
is why she stays at home Monday 
nights. If a stunning brunette with 
big blue eyes asks, "How are you, 
Lou?" it is none other than our 
Laurie. "Lucibelle" in Senior Play. 
"But life is sweet." 



HENRY, DOROTHY LOUISE 

Teachers' College 

To become a Navy nurse is Dot- 
tie's laudable ambition. "Oh, you," 
is her favorite expression. She in- 
tends to go directly into Cadet Nurs- 
ing. Rowling, '43, '44; Rasketball, 
'44 and Dramatic Club, '44 are her 
many activities. Strawberry sundaes, 
music, dancing and the Hit Parade 
are favorites. She gets along with 
people. 

"Her hair is of a good color." 



HIGGINS, GUELDA EDITH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Geebe" hopes that someday, after 
she's attended the University of New 
Hampshire, she will fly to a desti- 
nation unknown. You can tell it's 
"Guel" when you hear a cheery "Hi 
ya, kid!" She's been busy with 
Basketball, 1 ; Bowling. 1 ; Junior 
Nominating Committee ; Junior Prom 
Committee; and collecting football 
pictures and menus. Her pet peeves 
are washing dishes and waiting in the 
cafe line (raany's the time!) How- 
ever, she likes sports, Harry James, 
9 :20 Club, coffee frappes, and a cer- 
tain V-12! She talks too much, but 
never gets angry and will always 
lend a pal a nickel. 
"Ponder well, and know the right." 



HILL, MARY ELIZABETH 

College Course 

The mountain top where Mary will 
seek solitude after graduating from 
Radcliffe College will be surrounded 
by deep and weird valleys through 
which rush wild rivers. "Oh, Allah" 
she will exclaim as she turns from her 
paradise to compose her first literary 
effort. In training for this bia 
event, she has held the position of 
Assistant Editor of the Mirror m 
1943 and 1944 and has been a mem- 
ber of the Dramatic Club during the 
same period. 

"And turn the giddy round of 
Fortune's wheel." 

HUNTER. HOWARD WENT- 
WORTH 

Stenographic Course 

"Right behind you. Joe," says 
good-natured "Howie," who wants 
either to be a chicken farmer or a 
Marine. His activities were as mem- 
ber of Mirror Business Staff, and 
Sophomore Auditor, and Basket- 
ball IV. He likes neople with a lot 
of hustle. Bine Crosbv. and the Mu- 
sic Society of Lower Basin Street. 
"He is a farmer who viields the 
rake and hoe." 




HENDERSON, DORIS DAGMAR 

College Course 

"Dot , who is never on time, cries 
"Wait, Mary! ' Her ambition is to 
live in a French garret where she'll 
probably be singing, unless she is in 
the V. S. Nurses' Cadet Corps where 
she'll have to work better than she 
does now. She likes people, chocolate 
spdas, and walking in the rain, and 
"G's" after school. Her activities 
were Sophomore Dance Committee, 
Vice-President of the Junior Class, 
Member of S. D. S. 

"The eyes have it!" 



HESSION, BARBARA JEAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bea" whose ambition is to join 
the WAVES, can be found almost 
any time or any where looking for 
pictures for her fashion scrap-book 
and saying "Mercy." "Hesh" is des- 
tined to keep house. She likes John 
Charles Thomas, but not imitation 
glamour girls. Her temper is her 
worst fault. 

"Sober, steadfast, and demure." 



HIGGINS, ROBERT JOHNSON 

Business Course 

"What's the matter?" says Bob. 
who blushes furiously yet never gets 
angry. He would like to fly and 
hopes to enter the V-5 after gradua- 
tion. Sports, Kay Kyser, Bob Hope, 
and Harry James are all number one 
on Bob's Hit Parade. There is 
nothing that peeves him more than a 
certain left eyebrow from Newton 
and C. H. 

"/ had rather see a young man 
blush than turn pale." 



HOLLIS, WALTER WTNSLOW 

Technical Course 

Walter often asks his friends, 
"What can you do?" His ambition 
is to study electro-chemical engineer- 
ing. His hobbies are chemistry, 
physics, and stamns. His destination 
is the Naval V-12 program of some 
college. His activities have been the 
High School Band. Honor Roll, and 
President in charge of pool tables 
of the IV B Club. He dislikes some 
English literature, and some colors 
of nail polish. His worst fault is 
starting arguments in class. 
"Earnest effort carries a man far." 



HUNTER, MARJORIE LOUISE 

Business Course 

"Mars" expects to work in an of- 
fice. She plaved field-hockey and 
bowled in her Sophomore year. Hot 
fudge sundaes, potato chips. and 
home-made rolls a^ree very well with 
Margie, who likes Bing Crosby and 
Eddie Canter. As for "Frankie", 
conceited people and missing busses — 
well! 

"All to myself I think of you." 



.__, — — — Class of 1944 



HYNES, MARGARET 
JOoEfHlNE 

practical Arts Course 
"Oh, boy: says jfeggy, whose am- 
bition is to be a real success 111 lite. 
Jrier hobby is sewing and collecting 
snapsnots. .She expects to work at 
tne Kaytheon alter leaving scnool. 
Sne liKes eating peanuts while read- 
ing a mystery story or listening to 
tne 9:20 Club. Being late, especially 
lor dates, is Peggy s worst fault. 
A merry heart goes all the way.'' 



KAUFMAN, FRED 

Stenographic Course 

"Kaftee intends to be a court 
stenographer after the Army Air 
Corps needs him no more as an aerial 
gunner. He says "nuts" to almost 
everything, although he likes collect- 
ing autographs and taking part in 
sports, including baseball and basket- 
ball. He is the manager of a bas- 
ketball team in the City League. 
Wrestling matches on the radio and 
blondes are all right to him. 
"He that overcometh shall inherit." 



KELLY, BARBARA LOUISE" 

College Course 

"Barb always wants to know, "Is 
that good?" Her activities include 
Literary Staff of the Mirror, 1943- 
1944; Dramatic Club, 1941-1942; mem- 
ber of the S. D. S. ; Honor Roll, 1. 
2, 3, 4. "Kell" hopes to travel and 
to go to college. She does not like 
doing her homework. She blushes. 
She likes to listen to Bob Hope and 
Information Please. 
"The cheerful live longest in years." 



KING, CATHERINE MILDRED 

Practical Arts Course 

"Grandma's" favorite expression is 
"Plant me now — dig me later." To 
meet a certain some one and go 
everywhere is her ambition, although 
she plans to enter the Academy 
Moderne. She loves to eat but dis- 
likes getting D's. First Xighter and 
The Great Gildersleeve are her fa- 
vorites on the radio. She was Mirror 
Room Agent. 

"She that was so proud and wild 
Flippant, arrogant, and free." 



KOLODZIESKI, IRENE E. 

Business Course 

"What a lulu!" exclaims "Ike", 
who was a member of Dramatic Club 
1942 and wishes to be a success in the 
held of stenography and to travel 
around the world. She likes to sleep, 
which may be why she abhors doing 
homework. If you have any troubles, 
tell them to "Rene." for she likes 
to listen, but if you are conceited, 
don't; for she won't like you. She 
nrefers listening to the Hit Parade, 
Bob Hope, and Million Dollar Ball- 
room and likes collecting records. 
"Her agile mind, her honest heart, 
her strength ..." 




JOHNSON, JOANNE BARBARA 

College Course 

"Jody," who expresses herself with 
"Jeekers!" wants to be a successful 
musician, so she plans to attend the 
New England Conservatory of Music. 
1 lie Melody Hour and symphony 
concerts, letter writing, and hot fudge 
sundaes are favorites. No wonder 
she is always in a hurry, for her ac- 
tivities have been Secretary-Treasur- 
er, 2; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; and Honor 
Roll, 4. 
"She is a maiden young and fair." 

KEITH, ROBERT ALFRED 

Technical Course 

Bobbie can be heard announcing, 
"I wouldn't say that," as he dis- 
cusses his hope of being an airline 
pilot after the war. His destination 
is the Army Air Corps in the spring. 
He is an ardent sport fan and played 
hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4. He is president 
of the Blue Room in the IV B Club 
and was an usher at Graduation and 
Class Day. He enjoys watching his 
homework being slaved over by Paul 
3uiu3jsi[ os[E puE •SuiXdos Xsnq j\ 
to Bob Hope and Fibber McGee. 
"Women drivers!" he says, "What a 
nuisance!" 

"To get thine ends, lay bashfulness 
aside." 



KENNEY, HAROLD T 

Business Course 

"Red", whose favorite expression 
is "I wouldn't say that." wants to 
be first in Tokyo by way of the in- 
fantry. He dislikes women in gen- 
eral and corny jokes, but the 9 :20 
Club is tops. He played baseball, 1. 
"How happy's the soldier who lives 
on his pay." 



KINSELLA, DOROTHY LOUISE 
Business Course 

"What a beaut," says "Dot" who 
intends to do office work. She likes 
coffee ice cream, music, sports, and 
Bill, but dislikes onions and all con- 
ceited people. An Irish temper and 
laziness may help her to get mar- 
ried and raise an ideal family. 
"Mind cannot follow nor words 

express 
"Her infinite sweetness. . . " 



KOULOPOULOS, MICHAEL 

JOHN 

Technical Course 

"What's the homework?" yells 
Mike, whose best virtue is trying to 
keep Murph quiet, a task he never 
can do. He says he would like to 
go to M'. I. T. and that his hobbies 
are sports, radio, and aviation. He 
likes Bob Hope and sensible girls, 
but not leaky fountain pens. His ac- 
tivities include being Class President, 
1, 2, 3 ; Chairman Sophomore Social 
Committee; Football. I, 2, 3; Senior 
Dance Committee : President of Pol- 
itics, IV B Club. Best of luck, 
Mike ! 

"Even silence may be eloquent 
in love." 









—Class of 1944 



Hi«>oc»r.i 



KYBERT, BARBARA ELIZA- 
BETH 

College Course 

"Kybie" intends to go to a teach- 
ers' college or to join the WAVES. 
Her hobbies are music and athletics 
as is shown by her school activities : 
baseball, '42- '43; volley ball, '44; 
and basketball, '42, '43, '44. She is 
usually heard saying, "You crumb." 
Apples from a certain teacher are 
O. K. with her, but Frank Sinatra 
and Milton do not seem as interest- 
ing as Lux Radio Theatre. She ar- 
gues with a certain red-haired girl, 
but does homework and likes it. 
"Happiness courts thee in her best 
array." 

LANDSDOWNE, HELEN G. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Honey's" ambition is, after going 
to a school of higher education, to 
become a nurse. Her activities in- 
clude the Dramatic Club, basketball, 
swimming, dancing, and listening to 
Fred Waring and the 9:20 Club. 
Her worst fault is being too frank, 
but she covers this up by making 
friends and meeting people. Her 
hobbies include collecting flowers and 
making a poetry book. 
"Look ere thou leap. See ere thou 
go." 



LANDRY, MURIEL LILLIAN 

Stenographic Course 

"Mitzi" is often heard saying, "Oh, 
dear," as she hustles through the 
corridors. Her ambition is to be pri- 
vate secretary to J. J. G. She 
seems to enjoy letter writing (I won- 
der to whom) and indulging in a 
gooey strawberry sundae while lis- 
tening to Bing Crosby. She was on 
the Sophomore Social Committee ; 
Vice-President of the Sophomore 
Class ; and on the Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. We know Muriel will go far 
in life as she gets along with people. 
"Smiles that can warm the blood." 



LEARY, CATHERINE FRANCES 

Business Course • 

"Hurry up. Firebug," says "Kay", 
who is going to travel with the IV 
D. M. 1 girls. Her greatest ambi- 
tion is to join the WAVE'S, and her 
hobbies include collecting sailor dolls 
and snapshots. In '42 she played 
basketball. She claims that she likes 
everything and everybody. Brigham's 
hot fudge sundaes after long hikes 
rank high with "Kay." 

"She's everybody's friend and 
nobody's fee." 



LE BLANC, THERESA LEONE 

Business Course 

Theresa is often heard saying, "I 
like that!" She hoDes to go to a 
business school in Boston, then to 
California and the other states 
accompanied by Flo. She enjoys 
going to T. C. with J. B., but 
dislikes homework and Monday 
mornings. Skating and bowling 

are her favorite sports. Have you 
ever heard her talking too loud in 
the corridors? 

"Smooth runs the water where the 
brook is deep." 




LALLY, ROBERT EMETTE 

Business Accounting 
<( "What's the homework, Al?" says 
"Pegleg" who is always lending 
Stretch money and playing golf. 
This popular boy with a hard work- 
ing nature was on Basketball Varsity, 
41-44; Senior Dance Committee; and 
was Mirror Room Agent. The draft- 
board will decide his future, although 
he wants to go South and play golf 
with Corcoran. He is hard with 
himself, but he enjoys playing golf 
with Terry and Stretch, and listening 
to Harry James, and to Al's singing. 
"A merry lad is he!" 



LANDRY, MARY JANE 

College Course 

"Gee, do you look sharp!" is an 
exclamation often heard from Candy, 
who wants to join the WAVES and 
see the world. She likes dancing at 
Tote, musical comedies, and teasing 
B. K. She expects to attend either 
Boston University or a Dramatic 
School. Although she is naturally 
thoughtful, she is often late and dis- 
likes homework. 

"A smile for all, a welcome glad 
A jovial coaxing way she had." 



LAWSON CARL HARRY 

Teachers' College Course 

"Carlie" is often heard saying, 
"For crying out loud," while striv- 
ing to accomplish his homework. He 
seems to enjoy staying up late with 
the radio, of course. He has been 
a member of the band for three years 
and an usher at graduation and class 
day. He likes swing music and ice 
cream, but not forward girls. He 
is trying to keep out of trouble un- 
til the draft catches him. 

"A tiny stone often creates big 
ripples." 



LE BLANC, MILDRED YVONNE 

Stenographic Course 

"You're not kidding," says Millie 
who wants to be just like her mother 
and also a good secretary. After 
graduating she expects to start work 
in an office. She doesn't like con- 
ceited people, but does enjoy semi- 
classical music and Those We Love. 
Being self-conscious is her worst 
fault, and getting to school on time, 
is her best virtue. 
"Thoughtfulness makes friendships, 

and thoughtfulness keeps them." 



LEONARD, DOUGLAS GRAY- 
DON 

Practical Arts Course 

"You really think so?" asks cheer- 
ful "Doug," who was once an active 
member of South Dartmouth High 
and Wayland High. He hopes to be 
a Naval Officer and to see plenty of 
action, but after returning from sea 
adventures, he plans to be a criminal 
lawyer. He likes sports, dancing, 
and singing. He starts arguments 
and dislikes narrow-minded people. 

"I am the very pink of courtesy." 



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LEWIS, EVELYN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Are you kidding?" says "Evie" 
who wants to be a defense worker. 
Marines and Bing Crosby delight 
her, but childish boys, conceited 
people, and people who call her 
"Little Boom Boom" anger her. She 
is always late for appointments and 
frequently wants to borrow money. 
She prides herself on making and 
keeping friends. 

"Happiness grows at our own 
firesides." 



LYNCH, MABY ELIZABETH 

Special Course 

Although "Tish" is going into the 
Cadet Nurses' Corps, she hopes 
someday to enter the field of radio. 
Right now Brigham's fudge sundaes, 
Dick Jergen's Orchestra, summers at 
Onset, and Bob Hope are popular 
with her as well as the expression 
"What's new, Joan?" Her specialty 
is being happy which, perhaps, is 
why she listens to M. L. F.'s love 
troubles. Riding in a certain rum- 
ble seat, however, does not make 
her so happy. Her activities have 
been bowling, 1, 2; basketball, 1; 
Dramatic Club, 2, 4. 
"/ may be slow, but I am precious 
sure." 

MacDONALD, ANN LOUISE 

Business Course 

"Butch," whose favorite expression 
is, "Wait for me, kids," hopes to 
join the WAVE'S or own a dog farm. 
Her dream of being first in the 
cafeteria was never realized, nor could 
she find any menus to collect there. 
She likes dancing, Fred Waring, 
Fibber McGee, and drinking cokes 
with the gang, but she dislikes cats 
and people who rush. Although she 
is often late, she gets along with 
people. A member of the Dramatic 
Club, she also is active in archery. 

"A cheerful look makes a dish a 
feast." 

M->cDOUGAL. WALTER BRUCE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Mac" wants to lead the life of a 
Major in the U. S. Air Corps. His 
expression, "What's doing?" came 
from his activities on the Sophomore 
Social Committee, '42; Junior Prom 
Committee. '43; football, '42 and '43; 
and basketball, '42. His appreciation 
of good music and Bob Hope's pro- 
gram is why he listens to the radio 
on Tuesdays and Sundays. He is 
one of the few who doesn't care for 
flashy clothes. 

"Nor are all of one flight or of 
one force." 



MacNEILL. RUTH ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course 

Ruth is going to work at the Wal- 
tham Bag and Paper Comnany and 
would like to travel. She is a 
movie and radio fan and likes Alan 
Ladd. Ida Lunino, Bing Crosby, and 
Lux Radio Theatre. She also likes 
vacations and holidays. Homework 
and oral comoositions are terrible to 
her. If you hear, "That's crummy," 
you'll know she is around. 

"Quiet, serene, and placid." 




LIPPS, LINWOOD GORDON 

Business Course 

"Lipps's" favorite expression is, 
"Oh, I wouldn't say that." His 
ambition is to travel through the 
Pacific Islands with the Infantry. 
He likes cokes, gum, and Dick Tracy, 
but doesn't particularly care for food 
in a certain restaurant. For three 
years he has been an ardent member 
of the band. Modeling, collecting 
things, and drawing are his hobbies. 
"Round and round it goes 
And where it stops nobody knows." 



MacALPINE, ETHEL MADELINE 

Stenographic Course 

"Mac" is often heard saying "No 
kiddin'! You like that, Huh!", as 
she roots for the Coast Guard. She 
likes dancing and chocolate frappes, 
as well as Bob Hope. She hates 
getting up Monday morning and 
baby talk, but likes waiting for a 
certain ship to come in. She hopes 
to get to New York with Bunny for 
a vacation this summer. 

"... dares to laugh out loud 
and free." 



MacDONALD, MARY LOUISE 

College Course 

"Any mail for me?" cries "Mac" 
who wants to travel all over the 
world after going to Framingham 
State Teachers' College, where she 
will keep up with her hobbies, musjc, 
sports, and writing letters. Her ac- 
tivities include : Class Day Usher, 
'43; Dramatic Club, '44; basketball, 
'42, '43. She likes deviled ham sand- 
wiches, hot fudge sundaes, and the 
color green. She is always losing 
her temper, but calms down when 
the Melody Hour hits the air. 

"The world, the world is mine/" 



MacKinnon, kathleen 

ANN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ray's" dislike for people who 
aren't on time accounts for her say- 
ing, "Hurry up or we'll be late." 
She would like to go to a nice 
school and become an interior decor- 
ator. She likes hot fudge sundaes 
with all the trimmings (which she 
says she shouldn't have). Her worst 
fault is never wearing rubbers, but 
she makes up for it by putting on 
a sunny smile. 

"With a smile on her lips." 



McCarthy, theresa marie 

Practical Arts Course 

If you hear a voice cry, "Oh. 
brother!" it's Terry who is mad 
about Marines. Now she writes to 
them, but later she hopes to become 
a M'arine herself. She also likes 
chocolate pudding, Bob Hope, and 
Helen O'Connell. Getting into 
trouble and borrowing money are her 
worst faults. 

"ever to a soldier kind." 



► n.^»n.4E»" >«»■•>• 



Class of 1944- — •— « — 



Mcelroy, doris mary 

Business Machines Course 

"Mac" expects to have an office 
position or to take care of her 
Lincoln home. After the war she 
hopes to travel. She likes hot fudge 
sundaes, the 9 :20 Club, and Guy 
Lombardo's Orchestra. She is always 
on time. Wearing dark fingernail 
polish is her worst fault. Whenever 
she is around, you will be sure to 
hear her say "Yes, dear." 
'Home-keeping hearts are happiest." 



McHUGH, PAUL WARREN 

Technical Course 

One may often see "Red" soundly 
sleeping on the S. S. S. Viking, 
probably dreaming of Tufts, or the 
Navy Air Corps, or perhaps his du- 
ties as President of the IV B Club. 
He just loves sports and Bob Hope. 
His activities include Football, 3, 4; 
Basketball, 3; and Class Day Usher, 
3. His only faults are blushing and 
not liking French. He is often heard 
saying, "What can you do?" 

"All that glitters is not gold." 



MAIN, ROBEBT BEBNABD 

Business Course 

"Tell you what I'm gonna do" is 
"Mainsie's" favorite expression. He 
intends to go to Boston University. 
He likes Benny Goodman, Bing 
Crosby, the 9:20 Club, swing and 
dance music. He is sarcastic but 
frank and dislikes girls. 
"Wilt thou have music? Hark!" 



McMANUS, THOMAS ANOBEW 

Technical Course 
If you hear, "Don't tell me your 
troubles," you can be sure it is 
Tommy. Although he is studying to 
be an engineer, he hopes to join the 
A. A. F. He enjoys going in town 
and listening to Eddie Cantor and 
Bing Crosby but dislikes getting up 
in the morning. Taking care of 
Drury and leading Stevenson by the 
hand are his best virtues. His lead- 
ing activities are Honor Boll, 1, 2; 
and President in charge of Tearing 
off the Calendar for the IV B Club. 
"/ do not know beneath what skies 
Nor on what seas shall be thy fate; 
I only know it shall be high, 
I only know it shall be great." 



MARTIN, ALOYSE THEBESE 

College Course 

"Marty" or "Al" is one of the 
W. H. S.'s busiest persons, being 
the school band drum-major for four 
years ; on the Mirror Advertising 
Staff, '41-'42: on Literary Staff, '43; 
Dramatic Club, '43-'44 ; Humor Ed- 
itor, '44 ; on the volley ball and 
baseball teams. After she has 
graduated from Framingham State 
Teachers' College and has become a 
foreign diplomat. I wonder if she 
will still say, "Take a reading on 
that." 

"Gold dust blinds all eyes." 




McGOVERN, TERRENCE 

Practical Arts Course 

If you happen to see a certain 
basketball ace speeding about the 
streets of Waltham, you'll know it's 
"Terry" McGovern, whose vitality 
makes him dislike stop streets and 
red traffic lights. His ambition is to 
play golf all winter down South, and 
to enter all golf tournaments. He 
likes The Lone Ranger. One fre- 
quently hears him say, "Come on 
now!" He borrows money, but is 
always happy. 

"As swift as swallow flies." 

McKENNA, DOROTHY KEEFE 

Stenographic Course 

"Dottie" believes that being a 
nurse will lead to her ambition of 
living happily ever after. She has 
a marvelous idea for a heaven on 
earth — "a week without a guiding 
hand." Some of her very many ac- 
tivities are Sophomore Nominating 
Committee, Junior Prom Committee, 
Senior Dance Committee and the 
Honor Roll. When in doubt she can 
be heard saying, "What shall I do, 
Priscilla?" She likes dancing, her 
father's singing, and going to the 
N. W. W. Club meetings, but dis- 
likes writing letters, and her sisters' 
wearing her clothes. 
"The lovers of freedom will be free." 

MANGINI, VICTOR PAUL 

Business Machines Course 

After giving Tojo a hot foot and 
hitting Adolf over the head with 
some of his paper-hanging tools, Vic, 
the short, dark, and dateless kid, 
wants to travel the length and 
breadth of this country making 
sketches of important people. "That's 
the spirit!" may be always heard 
from Vic who has been Cheer Leader, 
2, 3 ; Captain, 3 ; and chairman 
tickets on the Senior and South 
Junior Dance Committees. He has 
done cafeteria work. We hope you 
get the muscles of Charles Atlas, 
plenty of home-made apple pie, all 
the swing and classical music you 
want, and a quiet movie house where 
no one will slap the wind out of you. 
"All tongues speak of him." 

MARCHAND, BETTY ANN 

Business Course 

"Red," who can't understand why 
she is called so, expects to travel 
with Ann and to own a car. She is 
often heard saying "Is it human?" 
She likes skating, and swimming, but 
dislikes people who slander Frank 
Sinatra. What about a good murder 
program "Red?" 

"Lovely to look at: delightful to 
know." 

MARTIN, WENDELL HOLMES 

Stenographic Course 

"Wendy" is often seen at the 
piano thumping away at popular 
songs. He enjoys Bing Crosby and 
I Love a Mystery. He likes to read 
good books and to Dlay basketball 
in the City League. He hopes to go 
to college or join the Marine Air 
Corps. He is often heard saying 
"And stuff like that there." He says 
that he dislikes girls, but knowing 
"Wen" we all know that this is not 
the truth. 

"Men are but children of a 
larger growth." 



Class of 1944—— 



MASE, THERE'JA ELIZABETH 

Stenographic Course 

When we near "Oh, Mama!" we 
know that "link" has once more 
been ottered a position on the foot- 
ball team. Her main ambition is to 
travel, but right now pineapple 
lrappes, dancing, nice clothes, and 
bob Hope appeal to this tall, wil- 
lowy girl. Her activities include 
Basketball, Baseball, Volley Ball, 
*ield Hockey, and Archery, and 
Honor Holl, 1, 2, 3. 
"A day for toil, an hour for sport." 



MEYER, WILLIAM GEORGE 

Business Course 

"Sharbo" is often heard saying, 
"What-a-ya-bragging?" His ambi- 
tion is to pass "type." He dislikes 
crowded school busses, but likes a 
certain brunette and listening to the 
9:20 Club. His hobby, a military 
matter, will aid him in the army 
and then to return to H. D. ! 
"The sweet expression of that face." 



MICKALSEN, ELLE'NA MERE- 
DITH 

Stenographic Course 
When ever you hear, "Braggin' or 
complainin'?" or "You can say that 
again" it's almost certain to be 
"Mike" all bothered about something. 
She intends to be a medical secretary 
and would like to do something ex- 
citing for a change. Her hobbies are 
sewing, reading, and trying to sing. 
She definitely likes Frank Sinatra, 
ensigns, and tall men. She served 
on the Sophomore Dance Committee, 
and is a member of the E. B. G. 
Club. Why does she laugh or blush 
at the wrong time? 
"Joy rises in her, like a summer's 
morn." 



MOGAN, PATRICIA PAULINE 

Business Course 

If you hear "Heck no" or "Why 
sure," you will know that "Firebug 
Mogan" is somewhere around. She 
enjoys collecting Pettv and Varea 
girls, and also dancing, especially 
tap. She hopes to ioin the WAVES 
and to travel to Texas and North 
Carolina — I wonder why? 

"Home . . . is . . . the sailor, 
home from the sea." 



MONKS. GEBALDINE 
JOSEPHINE 

Business Machines Course 

"My, but you look pretty messy" 
means that "Gerry," who is going to 
train as a Cadet Nurse is near. 
"Gerry" bnwls often and enjovs 
dancing and the movies. This stub- 
born but honest girl does not like 
conceited neople. Give her the 9 :20 
Club anytime. 

"/ knew by your eyes, the pearl 
of blue." 




MAYO, ALDEN SHELDON 

Technical Course 

''Shorties" ambition is to teach 
algebra in 04. He is often heard 
saying, "That ain't bad ". He col- 
lects records and stamps and hopes 
to enter either college or the Army. 
His activities were: Mirror Room 
Agent, 2, 3, 4; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3,. 
4; Class Day and Graduation Usher; 
and President in charge of "Wolves", 
IV B Club. He got good marks in 
Arthur W's tests. He sneers at 
"wise guys" and Frank Sinatra, but 
enjoys the Totem Pole and Bob 
Hope. 

"and yladly teach." 

MEZZONE, ANNA T. 

Business Course 

An enthusiastic follower of almost 
every sport, Anna also finds time to 
participate in some of them. After 
becoming a medical stenographer, she 
hopes to travel abroad and write a 
best-seller. Forgetting to greet people 
is her worst fault. Tommy Dorsey, 
Paul Whiteman, and A. G. are all 
"I A" with her. Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Bowling, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 
2, 3; and Field Hockey, 1, 2 are 
among her achievements. 

"To be rather than to seem." 



MIXON, ARTHUR JAME5 

Technical Course 

"Art" or Mix" is liable to say 
anything that pops into his head. 
His hobby is music, and he hopes to 
be an architect. His destination, if 
he isn't drafted, is Northeastern Uni- 
versity. He is active in music, es- 
pecially with the French Horn, the 
band, and the orchestra. He likes 
exercise and dislikes sloppy business 
and excuses. With a good disposi- 
tion, his stubbornness won't matter. 
Eating slowly is his special man- 
nerism. 
"Hear and see, and hold your peace." 

MONGEON, RICHARD O. 

College Course 

"Who's got the Latin translation?" 
is often heard by "Mongey's" class- 
mates. His ambition is being happy, 
so maybe you can understand why 
he was secretary of the Dramatic 
Club, '42. '43; President, '43, '44; 
and on Junior Nominating Commit- 
tee in '43. He collects records of 
Harry James or any hot trumpet. 
He will have to leave Tote and hot- 
fudge sundaes with that blonde when 
he joins the Marines, where he won't 
have to remember names nor get his 
own lunch. 

"Handsome is as handsome does." 

MORABETO, MABY R. 

Rnsiness Course 

"Are you kidding?" and "Hang 
it" are Mary's favorite expressions. 
She wants to visit every ball nark 
in the American and National 
I eaeufs. Her hobbies are baseball, 
basketball, and keeping a scraobook 
on baseball. She wants to buy a 
car with Pauline and to visit every 
state, esoecially California and 
Texas. She likes to chew sum b"t 
dislikes getting caught bv Miss R. 
"Laugh and the world laughs 
with you." 



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MORROW. PEARL FRANCES 

Practical Arts Course 

The Nurses' Corps will have an 
ambitious new member when Pearl 
joins it. "O my heavens!" she will 
exclaim when she sees how her snap- 
shots turn out. She likes reading 
and preparing foods and clothing. 
"A pearl among women." 



MULA. PATRICK ROBERT 

Practical Arts Course 

When "Pat,'' "Pasqua," or the 
"Duce" enters the Army next fall, 
he hopes to have a good chance to 
become a pilot. His hobbies are 
basketball and collecting tickets. 
(What kind Pat?) His habit of 
arguing with everyone and the train- 
ing he has had punching Ray Parker 
will help him in the army, where it 
is hoped he may sometimes hear the 
9:20 Club, and may never see Frank 
Sinatra. 
"The man-at-arms is the only man." 



MURPHY. GEORGE FREEMAN 

Technical Course 

"Murph," who "has no faults" and 
"no virtues" is very bashful but 
social. You can always hear him 
saying, "Hi ya, how are ya?" to 
everyone he meets. After graduation 
his destination is college where he 
will continue his hobby of reading 
as he studies to be an electrical 
engineer. He has been cheer leader 
1942; student manager of basketball, 
1941 : Graduation and Class Day 
Usher, 1943; President of IV B Club- 
house ; on Sophomore Social Commit- 
tee ; and Junior Prom Chairman. 
"Mischief sparkles in his eyes, and 
his laughter never dies." 

NELSON, GEORGE CARL 

Practical Arts Course 

"Stretch's" destination is either the 
Marines or the Air Corps, and his 
ambition is to fly commercial planes 
after the war. "Well! What do you 
know?" and "Hey! Mo!" are his 
favorite expressions. He likes Red 
Skelton's program, swimming, hiking, 
and football and dislikes too much 
make-up on girls. 

"A bird of the air shall carry the 
voice." 



NOONAN, ELIZABETH MARION 

College Course 

Joining the U. S. Cadet Nurses' 
Corps and seeing the world by plane 
are the ambitions of "Blue-Eyes" or 
"Bashful," who is forever saying. 
"Hi ya, kid. How's it going?" She 
likes Bob Hope. Harrv James, going 
to the movies with E. R.. the 9 :20 
Club, and the Firestone Hour, but 
dislikes Frank Sinatra and waiting 
for D. H. Doing homework, es- 
pecially Latin, is her proud accom- 
plishment. Activities have been Bowl- 
ing, 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Treasurer of S. D. S. 
Club ; Class Day and Graduation 
Usher, '43. 
"The ancient languages are the 

scabbard which holds the mind's 
{word." 




MITSE, VERA LOUISE 

College Course 

It sne is helping someone, borrow- 
ing money, or saying, "Are you kid- 
ding?" or "Really!" you can al- 
inosc be certain it's Vera. She hopes 
to enter the Cadet Nurses' Corps af- 
ter graduation. She likes writing 
letters, collecting records, and hear- 
ing bing Crosby, but she doesn't like 
to be kept waiting. What about 
'G. G." ! ! ! 

'So buxom, blithe, and debonair." 



MULLANEY, JOHN JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Red's" ambition is to join the 
Navy. His hobby is radio so he 
snould be quite useful at his desti- 
nation. Arguing with Pat Mula is 
his worst fault. Bob Hope is his 
favorite radio program. He dislikes 
Frank Sinatra and frequently shouts 
"Oh! I wouldn't say that!" 
"Rocked in the cradle of the deep." 



MYERS, BEVERLY 

College Course 

"Isn't that odd!" says Bevie with 
her unique laugh. She hopes to fur- 
ther her studies in music and writ- 
ing. Heated discussions with B. R. 
and R. B., upholding her title as 
"World's Worst Piano Player", and 
people who smile when they say, 
"Hello" are tops. Her worst fault 
is teasing "Van" and "Sal." She 
was Alumni Editor of the Mirror, 
'43-'44, co-editor of W. H. S. news- 
paper column ; on Senior Nominat- 
ing Committee ; D. A. R. Represent- 
ative ; Dramatic Club, 2 ; Bowling, 2, 
3, 4; Basketball, 2; and Class His- 
torian. 

"For nil the world would call her 
friend." 



NEWBY, EDWARD JOHNSON 

Practical Arts Course 

When "Shorty" has finished his 
course in radio, which he is taking 
in the Navy, he will be well on his 
way toward becoming an Admiral ! 
"You dear boy", he says on every 
occasion. He likes giris, chocolate 
malted milk, skating, football games 
and driving the Packard. 

"All stood together on the deck." 



NORTON, THOMAS HENRY 

Rusiness Course 

Tom's favorite expression is "I for- 
got to do it." To be an accountant 
is his ambition. Eating and sleeping, 
mocha frappes. raspberry cokes, and 
brownies are tops with Tom. Tak- 
ing ration stamps from customers 
thoroughly annoys him, as he works 
in the First National Store, but not 
for long. Bob Hope is his favorite 
program. 

"He can write and read and cast 
accounts." 






NOSEWORTHY, BERNICE 
MARY 

Stenographic Course 

"What's new?" says "Bunny,'' as 
she rushes in every morning just be- 
fore the last bell. Her ambition is 
to become a medical secretary and to 
travel on her old age pension. She 
likes vacationing in Canada, sports, 
Bob Hope, ired Waring and choco- 
late frappes, but dislikes Monday 
mornings. Her worst fault is burn- 
ing up the wires talking with Ethel. 

"A friend whose heart has eyes 
to see." 



O'HARE. MARIE E. 

Secretarial Course 

Marie finds sailing, swimming and 
chatting with M. E. L. particularly 
enjoyable. Among her activities are 
being a Mirror Agent, 1. 2, 3; a 
member of the Sophomore Social 
Committee ; Junior Prom Committee ; 
Senior Dance Committee; Senior Play 
Committee; and E. B. G. Club; 
Basketball, 1; Bowling, 1, 2. She 
would like to attend H. M. A. with 
E S 

"Beauty is truth ; truth beauty." 

OLNEY, ROBERT GORDON 

College Course 

"Bob," "Sahib," "Indian" (take 
your choice) Olney wants to see the 
world as an artist, an author, or 
otherwise, and also to be crazy and 
lazy. Arguing, promoting Student 
Government, and eating prove very 
satisfactory to this potential Marine. 
Mirror Art Editor, '42, '43, '44; Mir- 
ror Literary Contributor, '43 ; and 
Vice President and Treasurer of 
the Jaw Breakers of America, Local 
217 have taken up his time. He 
wears no tie, enjoys collecting bag- 
pipe records, and always has money 
or a pencil to lend. Sir Roger de 
Coverley and other English Literature 
displease him, but old clothes and 
quoting Gaelic and Assamese Gib- 
berish keep him happy. 

'Art for art's sake." 

O'NEILL, ETHEL MARGARET 

Business Course 

"Hurry up, Ann," and "Oh Golly" 
are heard from "Eddie" when she is 
not dreaming of travelling and get- 
ting married. Chocolate sodas, going 
to Boston, dreaming, and listening to 
Bing Crosby are the berries with her. 
She wants to join the WAVES after 
graduation. 

'Whose blue eyes glow like the 
sparks of fire." 



PARKER, PAMELIA Y. 

College Course 

"O Christmas," says "Pamie" when 
a girl wants to borrow her homework. 
Sewing and cooking are going to help 
her after she marries a certain sailor, 
or becomes a cadet nurse. The Navy, 
Phil Spitalny's All-Girl Orchestra, 
and the 9 ;20 Club are some of her 
favorites. Forgetting important things 
and eating a pint of ice cream every 
other day are her failings. She was 
on the Sophomore Nominating Com- 
mittee. 

"What is beautiful is good." 




NUSSINOW, BERNARD LEO 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bemie" doesn't think it necessary 
to worry about his destination since 
the Navy Air Corps has already 
settled it. He has an interesting 
hobby of seeing whether he can pos- 
sibly complete one week with some 
money left in his pocket. He is ac- 
tive every night, and during the days 
he is a member of the Dramatic 
Club. He played on the J. V. foot- 
ball team, 1941. His worst fault is 
borrowing money but he always pays 
it back. He enjoys Charlie Mc- 
Carthy and Baby Snooks. 

"Time , . . takes wing." 

OHNEMUS, MARGUERITE 
MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"Maggie", whose ambition is to be 
a success in whatever she attempts, 
can easily be recognized throughout 
the school by, "Hurry up, kids." 
Her activities include member of 
Sophomore Nominating Committee 
and Sophomore Social Committee, Mir- 
ror Room Agent; Honor Roll, 2, 3. 
When asked what her destination is 
she replies, "Who knows!" Fred 
Waring's music and classical pieces 
appeal to her, but not homework. 
"Her words are oak in acorns; and 

her thoughts are roots that firmly 
grip the granite truth." 

OMUNDSEN, RUTH MARIE 

Stenographic Course 

"Yah? No kidding!" says "Ruth- 
ie" who would like to travel to 
Europe after the was is over. Her 
worst fault is eating too many hot 
fudge sundaes, and cake with oodles 
of frosting. Horseback riding and 
drawing are her hobbies. She was on 
the Mirror Staff, '41, '42; Secretary 
of Junior Class ; and Senior Nomi- 
nating Committee. The 9:20 Club 
and Bob Hope are her favorite radio 
programs. 

"Beauty is power" 



PAGE, CHESTER BORDEN 

Business Course 

"What's cooking?" can be heard 
whenever "Chet" is around. This 
good natured fellow wants to be a 
C. P. A. after graduation. Sports, 
hunting and target shooting are a 
few of his favorites, plus writing 
letters to a certain college freshman. 
He likes coffee sodas and doing home- 
work! ! ! He'll be marching with 
Uncle Sam soon. 

"Fame is the thirst of youth." 



PARKER, RAYMOND AVARD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Yea", and "Let's not worry" 
are Ray's favorite expressions, which 
will be heard soon in the Army Air 
Corps. He asserts that he has no 
pet likes, but just likes to be present. 
Starving at lunch time in the long 
line is distasteful to him and he 
drools in class. "Abbie's Irish 
Rose" and "Duffy's Tavern" are 
Ray's favorites. He never plays 
hookey and always says "Thank you" 
after borrowing a quarter. 

"As the flights of eagles are." 






•<* 



PERILLI, RUDOLPH 

Business Course 

"How's Taters?" says "Stretch" 
by way of greeting. In deciding his 
ambition and giving him an unknown 
destination, the Draft Board has 
taken him away from girls, good 
books, and good pipes. However, he 
intends to get plenty of dancing, 
sports, and good music in the Navy. 
Here's hoping he goes right on liv- 
ing to laugh, and that he stays out 
of trouble. 
"Life is a journey: — on we go." 



POWERS, ALICE 

Business Course 

"Oh, Lordy" or "Gee Whiz" says 
"Al" who wants to join the WAVES 
and to be a success. Collecting sou- 
venirs is her hobby and she likes 
dancing, coffee frappes, and listen- 
ing to the Hit Parade. "Al", who 
gets along with people dislikes con- 
ceited people and trolley cars. Being 
late is her worst fault. 

"Kindness has resistless charms." 



POWERS, MARILYN FLORENCE 

College Course 

"You can say that again," says 
"Mai", who intends to travel after 
college. When she isn't writing to 
R O., U. S. N., she knits and col- 
lects records. Her activities : Varsity 
Bowling Team, 2-3 ; Dramatic Club, 
1-2; Class Play; and Graduation 
Usher; President of S. D. S. Club; 
and Honor Roll, 1-2-3-4. She is al- 
ways happy, but eating too much and 
talking with her hands are her worst 
faults. She enjoys listening to the 
New York Symphony Program. 

"Good humor is the sunshine of 
the mind." 



RAYFIELD, LILLIAN JOY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Golly" says Joy, who exoects to 
enter Pramingham State Teachers' 
College and become a dietition. Straw- 
berry ice-cream, movies, and Charlie 
McCarthy are tops with her. Col- 
lecting pictures of movie stars fills in 
her spare moments. She likes all 
people except those who are conceit- 
ed and those who are never on time. 
She goes to bed too late. Is that 
why she was on the Honor Roll 3? 
"It will come." 



RICHARD. WILLIAM ERNEST 

Rusiness Course 

Tf you happen to hear someone 
veiling. "Eat it' It's ice-cream." vou 
know it's just Rill, whose ambition 
is to retire when be is forty. He 
exnects to enter the Army after grad- 
uating. Swimming, bowling, 3"d 
canoeing are his favorite soorts. He 
eniovs Rob Hope and comical movies. 
but dislikes wearing shirts and neck- 
ties. His worst fault is not getting 
to work on time. 

"The noblest mind, the best 
contentment has." 




PORTER, J. SHIRLEY 

Stenographic Course ■ 

'"Hi, brotner," and "Gee, kids, 
what d ya say?" are Sis's often used 
expressions. She collects officials' 
badges and swimming medals, but 
just wants to take it easy and be 
tne best swimmer in the United 
States. She likes Spike Jones, Bob 
Burns, red hair and green eyes, but 
dislikes conceited boys. Her fault is 
being easily bored. A member of the 
M Club, and I. W. W., N. E. A. 
A. U., Boston Swimming Assoc, she 
bowled, 1, 2, 3, was on the Honor 
Roll, writes the W. H. S. Notes, 
and was a member of the Senior Play 
Cast. 
"A friend who knows, and dares to 

say, 
The brave, sweet words that cheer 
the way." 

POWERS, JOSEPH EDWARD 

Practical Arts Course 

When "Babe" becomes a naval 
officer, we're sure he won't "take any 
wooden nickels." He'll even be 
homesick for Brigham's, but he will 
keep out of trouble by minding his 
own business. Even then he may 
enjoy baked macaroni, bowling, and 
a good pipe, and ■ will continue col- 
lecting pictures and items about the 
Navy. 

"Music is . , . wild sounds civilized 
into time and tune." 

POWERS, RUTH 

Business Course 

"Oh, Christmas!" Baton twirling 
and reading, red dresses, and hard 
work in an office, dancing and lead- 
ing a well-known band — these will 
help Ruthie. Just now she sips milk- 
shakes while listening to Jack Benny 
and the Hit Parade. She hates being 
late. Member Senior Band, '40, '44; 
Mirror Room Agent, '41. 

"Charms strike the sight." 

RAPS, VANNIE LOUVERN 

College Course 

If either the Nurses' Cadet Corps 
or the Canadian Women's Air Corps 
takes "Lou," it will have a very 
athletic and lively new member, who 
will enter lugging a scrap-book of 
W. H. S. sports and looking a little 
regretful that she has had to give 
up owning her own football or hockey 
team. She has played basketball, 
volley ball, been cheerleader, and in 
Dramatic Club, and served in Junior 
and Senior Dance Committees. Choc- 
olate from Fanny Farmer while lis- 
tening to Dorsey brothers' music and 
the Molte Mystery Theatre are tops 
with "Van." Senior Play heroine. 
"Versatile, vivacious Vannie." . 



RING, JOAN ELLEN 

College Course 

"One never knows, does one?" 
whether Joan is dreaming about go- 
ing to Hawaii with Joyce, or about 
the college or business school she 
will attend. As a member of the 
Junior Prom Committee and of the 
Dramatic Club, she was always 
prompt. Her favorite hobby is taking 
and collecting pictures ; her favorite 
program, Ring Crosby ; and her fa- 
vorite discussion, the day's events 
with "Tish." 

"Beauty is the flower of virtue." 



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KISEBERG, BYLA RUTH 

stenographic Course 

".Don t let it bother you, says Byla 
as she comes in late, "'I ve been lis- 
tening to Bob Hope and couldn t 
leave. ' She gets along with every- 
body and loves Sunday afternoon 
rides. She dislikes people who borrow 
things and don t return them and 
also something which Shirley P. 
knows. She hopes to be a success in 
everything, but when asked what her 
destination is she says, "Who 
knows?" She's an active member of 
the "I. W. W." 
"With suck a comrade, such a friend, 

"I fain would walk 'til journey's 
end." 

ROBINSON, PATRICIA LOUISE 

Business Course 

To take a course in insurance 
brokerage and then to become a 
housewife is Patty's ambition. "Are 
you kidding?" is her favorite expres- 
sion, while music, art, and writing 
letters to keep up the Coast Guard's 
morale are her hobbies. She loves 
eating potato chips and to listen to 
Harry James. Her worst fault is 
almost missing the late bus to school. 
Her activities include Nominating 
Committee, '41, '42, '43; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Senior Class ; and Honor 
Roll, '41, '42, '43, '44. 

"Good things come in small 
packages." 

RODENHIZER, ALVIN 

Business Course 

No matter what one calls "Snow- 
shoes," "Big Al," "Gunboots," 
"Zeke" or "Smokey" — it's still 
Rodenhizer whose favorite expressions 
are "How's yer arm?" and "Corn 
and Peas ain't easily won." After 
sleeping ten years he wants to play 
college basketball and ride the rods 
with Lally and McGovern, but he 
has lately spent his time on Foot- 
ball, 4; Basketball, 3, 4; buzzing 
Lally's ear and as president of IV 
D A. His worst fault is lending 
money to Lally. 

"Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no 
more." 



RYAN, MARILYN, CLAIRE 

Business Course 

"Oh, Joseph," said Suzz, "when 
are we going roller skating?" "When 
you finish that bag of potato chips, 
are you going to be late as usual?" 
Don't argue, but have fun looking 
forward to P. E. I. 

"This bud of love." 



SABSAY, NATHAN 

College Course 

"That ain't bad!" "Nate" will 
shout as he bombs Tokyo as part of 
his adventures in seeing the world. 
When he comes home, he will have 
many new coins and stamps for his 
collection, and a new radio on which 
to hear mystery programs, Fred 
Allen, Dick Tracy, Donald Duck, 
and soft sweet music — while waiting 
to go out with some nice girl for a 
strawberry soda are his favorites. 
'Around the world away." 




RITCHIE, ARTHUR J. 

Practical Arts Course 

It's a far cry from Candyland to 
the Marines, where Art is now mak- 
ing his own movies with no girls to 
watch. 

"But the glory of the Present is to 
make the Future free." 



ROBINSON, ROGER TOWSE 

Technical Course 

"Get on it," says "Tubber" who 
plans to own a dairy farm after the 
war. His hobbies are women and 
athletics. Although he admits copy- 
ing homework, he has a good dispo- 
sition and, in turn, lets B. K. copy 
his homework. He likes all sports 
and Red Skelton, but girls with ex- 
cess "war paint" ought not to cross 
his path. President in charge of 
Dice in the IV B Club, Football, 
2,_ 3, 4; Basketball, 1. 
"At home in the field and forest." 



RYAN, BETTY ANN 

College Course 

When "Betts" gets beyond the 
opening chapter of her great Ameri- 
can novel, she will take time off for 
a little spaghetti, chop suey, and 
walking in the rain before she turns 
her steps toward the Massachusetts 
School of Art where she will avoid 
righteous people and early morning 
courses. She was on the Literary 
Staff of the Mirror, 3 ; the Adver- 
tising Staff, 2, 4. 

"Genius is the capacity of evading 
hard work." 



RYAN, RAYMOND LEO 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ray," who can be frequently 
heard saying, "Warm, ain't it?" 
wants to join the Navy. He likes 
to eat, but maybe he hasn't figured 
on his reaction to "mal de mer", or 
does he think he's immune? "Ray" 
is another of Bob Hope's fans, and 
a few years from now we may hear 
of him as President of a "Bob Hope 
for President" movement sponsored 
by Waltham's Class of '44. Lots of 
luck in the Navy ! 
"/ must go down to the seas again." 



SAULNIER, THERESA MARY 

Business Course 

"For crying out loud" says Terry, 
pushing back her hair. This happy- 
go-lucky girl likes dancing, 9:20 
Club, reading, swimming, and Ab- 
bott and Costello's radio show. She 
dislikes seeing girls smoking on the 
street. Her ambition is matrimony, 
but her destination is working in an 
office. 

"She brings such joy and shining 
things to pass." 



»m. — „___, — Class of 1944 — • — < — 



SCAFIDI, CARLO JAMES 

Business Machines Course 

"Carlo ' is always agreeable it 
would seem by his expression, "Must 
be if you say so" and "Wny Sho-A." 
Atter returning from the Navy, he 
hopes to become a physical instructor. 
A follower of all sports he was ac- 
tive in basketball, 42, '43, '44; and 
baseball, '42, 43, 44; and was on 
tne Sophomore Dance Committee. He 
likes meeting a certain someone (J. 
C.) as often as possible or listening 
to the 9:20 Club. Making "wise- 
cracks" at the wrong time and in 
the wrong room is dangerous, Carl. 
"Success, remember, came from toil." 

SECOR, SALLY 

College Course 

If you happen to see a sweet, hap- 
py girl running after V. L. R. yell- 
ing, "Wait for me," you know that 
"Zeke's" going to borrow some money 
from this poor unfortunate. Her am- 
bition is to fly around the world on 
"The Mars," own loads of sweaters, 
and join the Nurses' Cadet Corps. 
Her pet peeve is getting lunches for 
"those three" and listening to a cer- 
tain boy trying to sing "Mairzy 
Doats." Sally s activities include 
freshmen Nominating Committee; 
Dramatic Club, 1943; BasketbaU '42. 
"Dreams happy as her day." 

SHARPLES, GENE CAROLYN 

College Course 

Activities : Assistant Art Editor of 
Mirror, '42, 43 ; Exchange Editor of 
Mirror, '44; High School Column, 
'44; Dramatic Club, '43; Basketball, 
'42; Archery, '42; Volley Ball, '42; 
Honor Roll, '42, '43, '44; Mirror 
Room Agent, '44. "Well, what do 
you know!" says "Genius" or 
"Shrapnel" who wants to go to col- 
lege and own a soda fountain. She 
likes sketching, making football 
scrapbooks, and listening to Bing 
Crosby. Her best virtue is keeping 
R. T. happy, and her pet peeve is 
having her name misspelled. 

"The world is always ready to 
receive talent with open arms." 

SHEA, JOHN THOMAS 

Business Course 

"Johnnie" is invariably heard ask- 
ing, "Where's Guiney?" probably 
looking for the money he has lent 
him. He is an ardent fan of Red 
Skelton, but his broad smile slackens 
when he encounters women drivers. 
He enjoys horseback riding. We wish 
Johnnie all kinds of luck in fulfill- 
ing his ambition, the acquiring of the 
silver wings of the Army Air Corps. 

"A horse! a horse! My Kingdom 
for a horse." 



SHELDON, FRANCES LOUISE 

Stenographic Course 

"Oh! Heavens!" exclaimed "Fran," 
"I forgot to give that lady a new 
rationing blank." "Frannie" hopes 
to be a success in the business world 
as a secretary. She was on the 
Honor Roll, 1 ; and collects post 
cards. Her favorite radio program 
is Bob Hope. _ 

"Those eyes, affectionate and glad.' 




SCIPIONE, MARY LOUISE 

Stenographic Course 

"Skippy" wants to be a private 
secretary and has hopes of touring 
the United States. Whenever the 
expression "For Pete's sake" is 
heard, it's a certain indication that 
she is around. Movies, dances, and 
collecting pictures of movie stars 
are some of her pastimes. She is 
an ardent fan of Bob Hope and 
Bing Crosby and dislikes Frank Sin- 
atra's "swooners." She can't seem 
to get up when she's called. 

"He travels safest . . . who 
travels lightest." 



SEGIEN. ROBERT ROLAND 

Practical Arts Course 

Either Springfield College or Uncle 
Sam's Army will get "Bob" or 
"Butch" after graduation, and his 
ambition is to be a social worker. 
"Bob's" favorite expression is "How's 
things?" He collects coins as a 
hobby. He has been on the Senior 
Nominating Committee. He can be 
found listening to Bob Hope, watch- 
ing any sport, or dancing, but not 
listening to lectures or gossip about 
other people. His worst fault is 
putting off things which should be 
done. 

"Be wise with speed." 

SHAW, ANNA T. 

Stenographic Course 

"Oh really!" says "Chub," a 
member of the E. B. G. Club, who 
wishes to travel all over the world 
with Lil. Her favorite pastimes are 
sailing, roller skating, and playing 
tennis. Kay Kyser helps keep her in 
nights. Dull pencils and people an- 
noy her and getting lunches is her 
pet peeve. Ann's best virtue is her 
sunny nature, and her worst fault is 
getting into impossible predicaments. 
She hopes to be an efficient private 
seecretary. 

"Her mouth enriches the smile her 
eyes began." 

SHEDD, ELEANOR 

Stenographic Course 

"Ellie," a Fred Waring fan, hopes 
to own a sailboat someday and go 
to H. M. A. with M. O. H. She 
likes swimming, sailing and coffee 
ice-cream. Summer vacations on the 
Cane, sleepine late in the morning, 
and Glenn Miller's smooth music 
are other favorites. She was on the 
North Junior Alumni Committee in 
'41; Honor Roll, 2, 3; P. T. A. 
usher, '42, '43 : and a member of the 
E. B. G. Club. 

"Sailing, sailing, over the bound- 
ing main." 

SICOTTE, THERESE MARY 

Stenographic Course 

Whenever one hears. "Oh, No!" 
or "Hey. Spook!" he knows "Tinv" 
is near. Dancing, booeie-woogie, 
rnllectine stamos. and listening to 
Inner Sanctum pleases "Tree" who 
"■ants to be an airline stewardess. 
T4 e r activities include Basketball. 7" 
Raseball, 2: Archerv. ?: Field 
Hockev, 2 : and Bowling, 2. 
"A cheek where prows 
More than the morning rose." 



„_»„«» <»«_ «)«»<>«^..^t)«»«^c)—K>«»()«»<«( >> ia,ss oi 1944 **■»* 



SMITH, FRANCES CURTIS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Smitty s" ambition, to travel 
around tne world, will probably come 
tiue, as ner destination is the Cadet 
Nurses' Corps. "Jeepers crow" is 
her favorite exclamation. Her hob- 
by is drawing, which perhaps is why 
sue was on tne Advertising Staff of 
tne Mirror, '43, '44. 

' l'o see Iter is to love her.". 



STAMM, BERNADETTE MARY 

Stenographic Course 

"Gee whiz,'' says Bernie, who 
wants to become a private secretary 
and some day meet the One and 
Only. Dancing at Tote, singing, and 
playing the piano are her favorite 
pastimes. She likes smart clothes, 
interesting books, week-ends, and good 
music, and dislikes bookkeeping and 
Monday mornings. Her worst fault 
is worrying, and her special manner- 
ism is never keeping her feet still. 
"Her ways are ways of pleasantness 
And all her paths are peace." 



STRAZDAS, PHILIP JAMES 

Practical Arts Course 

"Doc" wants to be an ensign in 
the Navy, and after the war, to be 
the next President of Lithuania. In 
school he contented himself with 
Basketball. 1942-3; Baseball, '44; 
and Honor Roll, '42, '43. His 
greatest achievement is his ability to 
get an "A" from Miss Allen. He 
likes Bob Hope and sleeping till 
!0 a. m., and he dislikes conceited 
girls. 

" — the heart of the great ocean 
sends a thrilling pulse through 
me." 



TARANTO, ROSE 

Stenographic Course 

"Diane" is often heard saying, 
"Oo-oo" especially when the ensigns 
are going by. She enjoys going out 
in sport clothes whenever she can 
end the evening with fried clams and 
pickles. Smooth music, such as 
Harry James' and Dick Haynes are 
tops with her. Her ambition is 
traveling — her destination undecided. 
Member of the E. B. G. Club. 
"A comrade blithe and full of glee." 



TAYLOR. IRENE FRANCES 

Stenographic Course 

"Well, good" says Irene when you 
tell her that you have a hobby of 
writing letters to servicemen, too. 
She wants to be a success perhaps in 
Maine where she wants to live. She 
is never late, but worries nuite a bit. 
Traveling summers in Maine, and 
Bing Crosby's Kraft Music Hall are 
on the beam, while corny jokes and 
getting ud early are nil. 
"Worry is interest paid on trouble 
before it becomes due." 




SMITH, WILLIAM JOHN 

rractical Arts Course 

When you hear someone saying, 
"1 m strictly a defensive player, 
you Know "smitty" or "four Points ' 
is around. He has already joined 
tne Marines and wants to taSe a 
cracK at tne Japs. 1 his probably is 
wny his ambition is to walk through 
tne streets of Tokyo and Berlin. 
W. H. S.'s "Crimson Commandoe" 
lines all sports, Bing Crosby, and 
irank Sinatra. He keeps promises 
but stays out rather late. Bill's ac- 
tivities include football, Hockey, 
and being the very successful chair- 
man of the Senior Dance Committee. 
"Comrades, gird your swords 
tonight." 

STEVENSON, GEORGE FRANCIS 

Technical Course 

"Steve" enjoys his work at the 
Totem Pole, which he would like to 
own after the war is over and he's 
out of the Naval Air Corps. He 
frankly admits his worst fault is 
buying records. He truly dislikes 
Frank Sinatra but likes Bing Crosby, 
Fibber McGee, and going "in town." 
His activities have been Baseball, 
'43, '44 ; Senior Nominating Commit- 
tee, Radio Class ; President in charge 
of Recreation IV B Club. His best 
virtue has been taking care of 
"Droopy" and Mac. 
"A friend that makes the least noise 
Is often the most useful." 



SWEENEY, IRENE N. 

Practical Arts Course 

Irene's nickname is "I," and she's 
always saying "Oh, nuts." She hopes 
to be a cadet nurse and then 
to enter some hospital. "I" likes to 
swim and hear Frank Sinatra, but 
her favorite radio program is Radio 
Theatre. She dislikes doing home- 
work. Strawberry sundaes and the 
movies are fun. 

"The worst about medicine is that 
one kind makes another necessary." 



TAMULEWICZ, GERTRUDE 

ANN 

Business Course 

"It's about time," said "Gerty," as 
one of her friends was twenty minutes 
late. "You have missed the best 
part of the Lux Radio Theatre." 
She is looking forward to work in 
an office and hopes to travel and to 
see the world especially the famous 
sights. She enjoys reading, partic- 
ularly in bed. 

"Whole as the marble, founded 
as the rock." 



TERRIO, PATRICIA ANN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Get off my ear," and "no kid- 
ding," says Pat who wants to do 
fashion drawing and to attend 
Massachusetts Art School for which 
she practices sketching her friends. 
Her activities include Basketball, 
Bowling, and in her senior year the 
Honor Roll. She enjoys dancing, 
music, six-foot Marines, strawberry 
sundaes, and Alan Ladd, but dislikes 
conceited people. Her worst fault, 
talking too much, is offset by her 
good nature. 

"As the sun colors flowers, so does 
art color life." 






THOMPSON, PHYLLIS IRENE 

Business Course 

"Sis" or "Phil" likes bowling, 
skating, and tennis. She expects to 
work awhile and then to travel with 
the gang. She would like to be- 
come a good secretary. She also likes 
sports, cokes, and receiving letters 
from a certain person. Not doing 
homework and conceited peple are 
her dislikes although she gets along 
with everyone. You'll find this petite 
girl always saying, "Gee," and "Are 
you kidding?" 

"Fair is she to behold." 



TOMAO, JULIA 

Business Course 

"Julie" likes movies, sports, and 
Sinatra, but dislikes anything to do 
with studying, and is happy-go-lucky 
until a test arrives. Her favorite ex- 
pression is, "Are you kidding?" She 
wants to travel and become a success 
in the business world, and her hobby 
is collecting Sinatra records. 
"She shall tread on frail arbutus." 



TROMBLEY, JUNE 



TRUE, DOROTHY 

Technical Course 

"Dottie," whose ambition is to 
teach geometry but who expects to 
work in the Watch Factory, is one 
of the few girls who like math. She 
enjoys vanilla milk-shakes and Bing 
Crosby, but dislikes late people. She 
is good-natured and has a sense of 
understanding. Her activities in- 
cludes the Honor Roll, 1, 2. "Am I 
late, Miss Clement?" 

"To walk there, to dream there, 
beneath the sky's blue bowl." 



TURNBULL, RICHARD 




TINGLOF, RICKARD MAT- 
THEW 

"Quiet or I'll slug ya," says 
"Ting," the second Vice-President 
and pecretary of tne Jaw Breakers 
of America, Local 247. He likes his 
Saturday evenings at Orange Street 
and listening to Eddie Cantor. "Tan- 
glehoofer's" worst fault is not doing 
homework, but he thrives on keeping 
Mr. Ward happy. To own a base- 
ball club after he comes out of the 
U. S. Army is his ambition. His ac- 
tivities include Cheerleader, '42, '43; 
Dramatic Club, '40, '41, '42, '43; 
CVeep's Basketball Club, '43, '44. 
'It is the talent of human nature to 
run from one extreme to another." 

TOMASELLA, MARY LOUISE 

Stenographic Course 

If you hear someone yelling, "Hey, 
Diane, wait for me," and tottering 
on high, high heels that is "Tommy," 
who is pleasant to everyone. She 
hopes to visit India and become a 
newspaper woman. A member of 
the E. B. G. Club, "Tommy" likes 
pineapple sundaes, but not her home- 
work, being short, or conceited girls. 
Her favorite programs are Bob Hope 
and Jury Trial. 

"Time conquers all, and we must 
time obey." 

TROTT, THEODORE THOMP- 
SON, JR. 
Technical Course 

Ted, a member of the Dramatic 
Club for four years, reports for the 
Naval Air Corps July 1, 1944, but 
he would like to be a flying chap- 
lain in the Navy. He spends his 
time helping Mr. Garahan although 
his favorite subject is physics. T. 
T. T- often heard saying "Woof- 
woof," possesses an unusual size 
13^ foot. 

"Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art 
thou Romeo?" 



TRUE, E. JEANNETTE 

Special Course 

"Jet's" or "J. T.'s" great ambi- 
tions are to get to heaven and to 
become a capitalist. Her hobby is 
collecting books, and her destination 
is Leland Powers School of Drama. 
Her favorite expression is "You 
character," while her favorite topic 
is her little nephew, Sherman. She 
relishes dill pickles and vanilla cokes 
and claims to be a "voice" fan. Her 
activities include Dramatic Club, 1, 
2. 3 ; Sophomore Nominating Com- 
mittee ; Mirror Room Agent, 1, 2; S. 
D. S. Club, 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club 
Plays, 1, 2.- 

"She is one out of many." 



TYLER, BRENTON EUGENE 

Technical Course 

Junior, often heard saying, "That 
ain't bad!" plans to go into business 
with his father, and, eventually, into 
the Naval Air Corps or maybe that 
will be vice versa. He plays the 
organ and piano, and likes to dance. 
We have heard it rumored that huge 
strawberry sundaes aren't safe when 
he's around. Junior has been on the 
Honor Roll, and is a laboratory as- 
sistant. He admits that his worst 
faults are mindine others' business 
and bothering M. B. D. and C. C. 
"A man always studying one 
subject." 






UBERTI, EVELYN JANE 

College Course 

"E'v's " expression, "Good night," 
is well known to her friends. She 
hopes to graduate from college and 
be a success in life. Gardening and 
playing the piano are her hobbies, 
but she also enjoys puns, good books, 
listening to the Telephone Hour, and 
eating. She is good natured but that 
doesn't get her anywhere on the 
crowded buses which she dislikes. 
Her activities : Mirror Room Agent. 
1 _; Assistant Editor of the Mirror, 3 ; 
Co-Editor-in-Chief of Mirror, 4; 
Secretary of S. O. S. Club; Grad- 
uation Usher, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

"A dillar, a dollar, an all A 
scholar." 



VENO, MARY ELIZABETH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jinx's" ambition is "to meet a 
certain someone" and to travel. Her 
destination is a school of dress de- 
signing and business with "Tex." 
She is vice-president of the W. H. 
H. U. B. Club. Swimming, Harry 
James, Dick Haynes, and blondes 
are strictly all right with her. Red- 
heads and conceited people are her 
pet peeves. Her best virtue and worst 
fault is being frank. 

"Where beneath another sky 
Parrot islands anchored lie." 



VISCOGLIOSI, LAURA 

Stenographic Course 

"I know it," may be always heard 
by "Lorry," who wants to circum- 
navigate the world with R. T. and 
meet important people. Her likes 
are classical music, ensigns, straw- 
berry sundaes, and dashing R. S. but 
not housework and conceited girls. 
After graduation she hopes to attend 
some Co-ed school. Lorry is one of 
the active members of the E. B. G. 
Club. 

"Revea/mffS deep and clear are thine 
of wealthy smiles." 



WALKER, JOHN 

Practical Arts Course 

When you hear, "Oh, Brother!" 
you'll know "honest John" is around. 
This happy fellow enjoys singing in 
the corridors and therefore dislikes 
unappreciative teachers. He doesn't 
like blondes, brunettes, or redheads 
(woman hater). His ambition is to 
be a golf pro. Frank Sinatra is ter- 
rible: Bing Crosby tops his list. 
John thinks that Superman is the best 
program on the radio. His activities 
include baseball manager, 2, 3, and 
basketball squad, 4. 

'There's many a road to travel." 



WELLINGTON, FRANCES 
DOROTHY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Shorty's" favorite expression is 
"Really." Her ambition is to travel. 
(We wonder where). She finds time 
to like skating, swimming, playing 
tennis, cooking, and music, but she 
doesn't like gymnastics. Whenever 
Fibber McGee and Molly are on the 
air, you can be sure to find Shorty 
curled up before the radio. Her 
worst fault is worrying, but she will 
get over that after she gets to work. 
"As quiet as a mouse." 




VANARIA, FRANCES AGNES 

Business Machines Course 

When you hear, "Are you kid- 
ding?" it's almost sure to be Franny, 
the girl who collects knick-knacks, 
post cards and souvenirs. To work in 
an office and be a real success in the 
world of business is what she has 
studied hard for. She hopes to find 
time for Lux programs, dancing to 
waltzy music, bowling, and the mov- 
ies. She is certainly not going to 
miss giving compositions. 
"So sweet the blush of bashfulness." 



VINCENT, WILLIS EARLE 

Practical Arts Course 
"Will" or "Willie" can always be 
found either at the movies, reading 
a good novel, or listening to Kay 
Kyser, his favorite radio star. The 
Army Air Force is his destination, 
where he expects to train as a fighter 
pilot. 
"Oh darkly, deeply, beautifully 

blue 
As some one somewhere sings about 
the sky." 



Von HOFF, ANITA HAZEL 

Business Course 

Ouiet boys and damp weather make 
"Mac" say, "Darn damp out" or 
"Oh prunes." After being a Cadet 
Nurse she can keep her spouse fit 
and be happily married. She collects 
photographs and likes to have dates 
in beautiful clothes. Frankie's and 
Bing's urograms thrill her. Although 
she claims she is late and lazy, may- 
be she'll go far in this world be- 
came she likes meeting Deople. 
"Nor spring, nor summer beauty hath 
such grace." 



WATERHOUSE, CONSTANCE L. 

Teachers' College Course 

"Connie," who likes hot fudge sun- 
daes, juicy steaks, sports, dancing, 
and the Lux Radio Theatre, can 
oftimes be heard saying, "Oh, 
brother!" She plans to attend Mary 
Brooks School to study to be a 
laboratory technician. She particu- 
larly dislikes homework, coffee ice 
cream, and doing dishes. Her activi- 
ties have been bowling, archery, and 
Honor Roll. '43 ; Dramatic Club ; 
basketball, '44. 

"She has a smile in her eyes." 



WELLS. ETHEL MARY., 

Business Course 

Mary, whose hope is to see the 
other side of the world, is' always 
asking, "What do you know?" 
Though always ,late for appointments, 
she answers her letters promotly. 
She will Drobably dance, bowl, drink 
cokes, and listen, to the radio on the 
highway to a New York Dude Ranch. 

"A horse/ a horse! My kingdom' 
for a horse!" 



,—.,—„—,——,—,—,-.—,— .Class of 1944 



■•i-mss '>i«»'i«»(i4»'>«%i^i 



WHEATON, BARBARA ANN 

Business Course 

"Barbs" or "Barby" wants to 
travel. After school she hopes to 
work in an office. She dislikes wait- 
ing for people and is always for- 
getting things. The 9 :20 Club is 
her favorite program. 

"Brown hair — eyes of blue." 



WHITE, LILLIAN THERESA 

Stenographic Course 

"Lil's" ambition is to attend B. 
U. to train for an executive position, 
and then make $100 a week. She 
says "Huba, Huba," and "Hey, 
where's Shaw?" has a mean temper 
which she doubts ever learning to 
control, and dislikes bashful people. 
Her favorite pastimes are swimming, 
sailing and skating. She claims that 
the cat parties with the seven other 
members of the E. B. G. Club are 
high on her list of "musts". She 
was on the executive committee of 
the Dramatic Club and in the Senior 
Play. 

"Merry and mad and' friendly and 
bold." 

WINBERG, WILLIAM 

Technical Course 

"Well, now that ain't bad," says 
good natured Bill, who looks forward 
to engineering and a commission in 
the navy. His activities include 
Honor Roll, 1 ; Radio Class ; and 
President in Charge of Athletics, IV 
B Club. Tommy Dorsey's "Boogie- 
Woogie" and Bing Crosby are tops 
on his list, but not Frank Sinatra. 
"Once more upon the waters! 
Yet once more!" 



WOODWARD, LEIGH SCOTT 

Technical Preparatory Course 
Leigh, commonly known as 'Wood- 
ie," is fullfilling his ambition to be 
in the United States Air Corps. Be- 
fore he's through he wants to earn 
a commission. He collects victrola 
records and likes Harry James' 
"Trumpet Blues" and any kind of 
ice cream. He was IV B President 
of Education, but he admits that he 
doesn't like homework. 

"Life is a warfare." 



WYMAN, MARJORIE LOUISE 

Bu.-.iness Course ' 

"Midge," who wants to be a great 
success in the business world, expects 
to work in an office. She was a mem- 
ber of the Sophomore Social Com- 
mittee, and the Senior Dance Com- 
mittee. She collects souvenirs, writes 
lots of letters, and likes to dance 
and see Bill. The 9:20 Club is her 
favorite radio program. She dislikes 
doing homework, although she can 
often be heard exclaiming, "It's a 
great life!" 

"Whom love finds young, she 
tis young still." 



keeps 




WHITCOMB, RICHARD OWENS 

College Course 

"Hey, that ain't bad!" says 
"Whit" whose ambition is to succeed 
in anything he does. His hobbies are 
sports and carpentry. He expects to 
go to college or to enter the army. 
His activities include: Football, '42, 
'43 ; Sports Editor of the Mirror, '43, 
'44; band, 2, 3; and the Highlanders' 
Basketball Club, '44. He likes va- 
nilla frappes and listening to The 
Mayor of the Town, but dislikes 
silly girls and homework. He lacks 
ambition but is good natured. 

"What sweet delight a quiet life 
affords." 



WILLIAMS, LEON ALTON 

Business Course 

Lee hopes to become a C. P. A. 
and expects to join the Navy. . He is 
interested in sports, especially racing. 
He makes a special point of listen- 
ing to Bob Hope but cares nothing 
for Frank Sinatra. He twirls his 
hair when worried or thinking and 
sometimes he teases people about 
various things. 

"Some love to roam o'er the dark 
sea's foam, 
Where the shrill winds whistle 
free." 



WINSLOW, MURIEL ANN 

Stenographic Course 

"Holy Cats" or "Oh, Brother" an- 
nounces "Red," who wants to be 
either a good business woman or a 
secretary in a large office. Jovial 
"Willie" is always smiling and tell- 
ing people what is on her mind. She 
likes to listen to Symphony Concerts, 
Henry Aldrich, and Judy Canova. 
"Joy has its friends." 



WOODWARD, PRISCILLA H. 

Business Course 

"Puss" wants to be an aviatrix 
after attending Lasall, Jackson, and 
flying school. The Civil Air Patrol, 
dancing, and entertaining servicemen 
are her pastimes. She enjoys the 
drugstore after school with Dottie, 
Fran, and Marigold, but people who 
keep her waiting (like McKenna) an- 
noy her. Bob Hope and Those We 
Love are her favorites on the radio. 
Her activities include Mirror Busi- 
ness Staff 1, 2, 3; High School Notes, 
3 ; Usher for Class Day, '43 ; and 
rationing, 2. She is a member of 
the I. W. W. 

"Her eyes are homes f silent 
prayer." 

ZAIA, MARION NINA 

Stenographic Course 

Marion's ambition is to be a roving 
reporter for the local paper. Her 
hobby is collecting newspaper clip- 
pings. She enjoys listening to class- 
ical music and Fred Waring. She 
dislikes dancing, and she is very 
friendly with everyone. She hates 
arguing with her younger brother. 
Is it because in the end, he wins? 
Her favorite expression is "That 
would be nice." 

"Sugar and spice and all things 
nice." 






GASPER. JOHN H. 

Practical Arts Course 

As an aviation mechanic in the 
Army Air Corps Jack will be making 
a different kind of music from that 
he made in the band, I, 2, 3, and 
the orchestra. "How's it going, 
boy?" There won't be any more 
homework, nor will Frank Flood's 
lunches disappear in physics. Jack 
dislikes gold diggers and Frank 
Sinatra, but has some favorite radio 
programs. 

"Of all noises music is the least 
disagreeable." 



DOIRON, JOHN JOSEPH 

Practical Arts Course 

When Jack comes back from the 
Army Air Force after the war, he 
viill sit at his typewriter with plenty 
cf "cokes" to cheer him up, and write 
about his experiences. He won't 
care if frank Sinatra has gone out 
of fashion, but he will still listen 
to Bing Crosby, along with Benny 
Goodman's and Harry James's or- 
chestras. 

"Thus I set pen to paper with 
delight." 



TAPPLEY, HARRY RAYMOND 

Business Course 

If you saw a fellow walking 
around school with a "sharp" hair- 
comb, he was most likely "Topper." 
Dancing, tennis, hockey, and the 
9 :20 Club are tops with him. A 
member of the hockey team, he 
played for three years. "Topper" is 
now a member of the Navy Air 
Corps, V-5 at Brown University. 
"A beau is one who, with the nicest 

care, 
In parted locks divides his curling 
hair." 



1944 GRADUATES OF 
ARTHUR A. HANSEN TRADE SCHOOL 

Bartholomew Defino 
Frank Harper 
Earl Porter 
Veto Stalman 
Robert Bryant 
Manus McShane 

POWER STITCHING DIVISION 

Eileen Poirier 
Josephine Zanco 



..-.o^,,-^— „_ „-™ — Class of 1944 




Who's Who 



Boy Most Likely To Succeed 
Girl Most Likely To Succeed 
Most Popular Boy 
Most Popular Girl 

Girl Most .Likely to Succeed Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 
Class Wit 
Best Dressed Boy 
Best Dressed Girl 
Brightest Social Light 
Most Athletic Boy 
Most Athletic Girl 
Personalty Plus 
Glamor Girl 
Most Studious Boy 
Most Studious Girl 
Best Actor 
Best Actress 




Most Popular Girl 





? ? ? 



Victor Mangini 

Evelyn Uberti 

Victor Mangini 

Beverly Myers 

William Richards B °y Most Likel v t0 Succeed 

Ruth Omundsen 

George Freeman Murphy 

Joseph Giamo 

Laura Viscogliosi 

Marie O'Hare 

Walter Anderson 

Alisca Cullen 

Beverly Myers 

Laurie Haynes 

Alden Mayo 

Evelyn Uberti 

George Freeman Murphy 

Carmela Costa 




Most Popular Boy 




I 0*ER 

there], l 

VIHEN--^ 
Best Actor 







Most Athletic Girl Brightest Social Light Best Dressed Boy Best Dressed Girl 







Most Studious Girl Most Studious Boy 



Class Wit 



Glamour Girl 





Personality Plus 



ITMI-T1-TT V^13.SS Ol 1^/44 ■■■'■■=>"-«a°>-'>*=-"^><X^-'>^>'X»-» ^ » 1H 



C/^m P#^ 




* 



ALISCA CULLEN 



In Waltham High — our landing barge — 

We near our destination. 
Our thoughts are rampant while our souls 

Are filled with expectation. 

The clouds break 'way — reveal Success 

For Life can be surprising. 
The thought that struggle is at hand 

Lends strength to our uprising. 

The landing ramp is lowered; 
We haste to take position. 

We dig our foxholes, try to make 

This land our acquisition. 

The fight is fierce, the way is filled 

With obstacles to hinder: — 
The Bombs of Sorrow, Shells of Strife, 

To tear our lives asunder. 

Against these barriers we'll fight 
We're not afraid to meet them. 

For we, the Class of '44, 

Have courage to defeat them. 

Alisca Cullen. 



Class of 1944— 



Class History 



RANDMA hasn't for- 
gotten that tomorrow you 
graduate from high school, 
for it is also the fiftieth anni- 
versary of my Class Day 
1944. So, Jane, run to get 
me my old Mirror magazine 
in the attic and I'll tell you 
the story of my high school 
days. 

I wasn't much older than 
she is when I entered Wal- 
tham High School, but I re- 
member that day as though 
it were yesterday. 

Thank you, dear; I'll hold 
it on my lap, and you sit 
here, close to me. My story 

starts very much like yours .All through 

grammar and junior high school, our class of '44 
awaited the glorious day when Waltham High 
School would open her doors to us and claim us 
her students. We would gaze at sixteen-year-old 
boys and girls returning home from school laden 
v/ith books and heave sighs of longing for the 
time when we should become members of the es- 
teemed clan of "Senior High Schoolers". The day 
finally arrived. It was in September 1940, when 
we were enrolled in the massive building which 
frightened us but filled our hearts with "Grown- 
up pride." We soon acuainted ourselves with the 
school which was to be our home of learning for 
the next four years, and we settled down to ac- 
complish the work expected of us. 

Here, Janie, is a picture of our sophomore 
class officers. This blonde boy is Connie Erickson, 
our class president. He was a crafty football 
player and basketball player of note. He left 
school in his junior year to join one of the best 
teams in the world, Uncle Sam's Navy. This girl 
beside him was our sophomore vice-president, 
Muriel Landry; and here is Joanne Johnson, 




BEVERLY MYERS 

Writer of Class History 



our secretary-treasurer. She 
was a brilliant pianist 
Our class auditor was a canny 
young Scot, named Robert 
Bruce. These officers led our 
class well through those care- 
free sophomore days. 

What an exciting time 
everyone had at the Sopho- 
more Social, we danced to 
the music of Howard Gad- 
boys, and the entertainment 
was furnished (in the form of 
a variety show) by members 
of the class. Michael Kou- 
opoulos and his committee 
were well rewarded for their 
capable work because finan- 
cially and socially the affair was successful. 

In 1941 the United States declared itself a 
warring nation. Everyone was certain that the 
sophomore class would eventually be affected, 
and, as the days passed, the shadows of war 
lengthened. Many of us grew mentally and as- 
sumed new burdens. Class programs changed, 
but we remained faithful to our class motto "Sem- 
per Paratus" and tried to live up to the new 
morale motto "Keep Smiling". 

We enjoyed our summer vacation as all school 
boys and girls do, but the thoughts of the Junior 
Prom made many of us rejoice when once more 
Waltham Senior High School welcomed us back, 
only this time we were accepted members of her 
family. 

See this picture at the top of the page? Those 
four young people were our class officers. The 
tall dark-haired boy is Mike Koulopoulos, our 
president, one of the best-liked boys in the school. 
His work on the football team and the baseball 
diamond cannot pass without comment. Doris 
Henderson, the vice-president, hoped some day to 
become a noted singer; and our secretary-treas- 



, — — Class of 1944 • 



urer, Ruth Omundson, caused deep sighs from 
doting admirers because of her Nordic beauty. 
The boy standing next to Ruth was our class 
auditor, Howard Hunter. 

Here is one of your favorite pages, isn't is, 
Janie? I guess these strips of crepe paper and 
that shriveled balloon I have pressed between the 
pages on the Junior Prom have grown to mean 
as much to you as they mean to me. Our prom 
chairman was Clinton Coolidge of gridiron fame. 
Financially the prom did not do so well as it 
might have done, but socially the committee 
scored a victory. You see, dear, the war managed 
to seep into the junior prom plans, for three days 
before the eventful evening, gas rationing went 
into effect. Nervous fathers refused to let plead- 
ing sons borrow the car for fear of the threaten- 
ing O. P. A. ; so you can be certain a great many 
girls cancelled their beauty parlor appointments 
when this was announced. Some thought of our 
class motto, "Semper Paratus" and "kept smiling". 
Chappy Arnold's orchestra played for dancing, 
and the gym, beautifully decorated with the class 
colors, purple and gold, brought "ohs" and "ahs" 
of appreciation from everyone present. 

We clearly remember the person, much like 
Paul Revere, who burst into the gym shouting, 
"The O. P. A.'s coming". Many wide-eyed girls 
were left standing in the center of the dance floor 
while their escorts darted out of doors to rescue 
the family buggy. 

Yes, being a junior was fun, but each of us 
noticed that our class was slowly dwindling, and 
all the pleasures school afforded us brought to 
memory the boys and girls leaving each day. We 
numbered 455 in the sophomore year, and we 
wondered how many of us would be seated on the 
platform graduation day. 

The fall of '43-'44 was like a dream come true 
because Waltham High School's football team was 
the Eastern Massachusetts Class A Champion. 
It won each of its eleven games. William 
Smith and Bob Driscoll exploited their athletic 
talents to perfection, while Sal Rizzo, Tony 
Romano, Walter Anderson, and Ernie Zeno re- 
ceived "All Star" honors. Thanks to the cheer- 



leaders, Victor Mangini, Richard Hart, Vannie 
Raps, Marjorie Jones, Phyllis LeShane, Ruth 
Christianson, and Bill Power, the school spirit 
was at a new peak, and everyone was very proud 
of our Crimson Wildcats. 

This, Janie, is our Senior Class President, Mike 
Koulopoulos, whose popularity was proved when 
he was voted president of the Senior Class. People 
were beginning to think Mike would lead a po- 
litical career like that of Franklin Delano Roose- 
velt, who in that day was contemplating his fourth 
term. Mike, however, left school in his Senior 
year to join the Navy. We missed him so much 
on Class Day. Patricia Robinson was our vice- 
president. Walter Anderson, whose skill on the 
hockey team was recognized along with Bob 
Keith's, Bill Smith's, Bob Driscoll's and Harry 
Tapply's, was our secretary-treasurer, and Hazel 
Dunbrack was our class auditor. 

Our first affair was the Senior Dance. Bill 
Smith was elected chairman. This group of 
smiling faces is Bill's wonderful committee. They 
had a right to be happy, for the dance was one 
of the most successful the school has ever seen, 
with the profit close to $100. Thanks to Marie 
O' Hare's artistic talents, the gymnasium -was 
dressed to perfection. 

Another dream came true when the Waltham 
High School basketball team won all of its fifteen 
games. For the first time our school received an 
invitation to compete in the Tech Tourney at the 
Boston Garden. Carlo Scafidi, Terrence McGov 
ern, Robert Lally, and Alvin Rhodenheizer, all of 
the class of '44, proved they had what it takes 
to be champions. Bill O'Brien, a sophomore, 
showed that next year's team might also live long 
in the annals of Waltham High basketball history. 
Our mighty five managed to be eligible for the 
final contest at the Garden, but Somerville's six- 
foot-three Tony Lavelli shattered our hopes for 
the state championship. 

Because the senior dance was a success, Mr. 
Ward, our class adviser, and Mr. Goodrich, our 
highly esteemed headmaster, agreed to let us stage 
a Senior Play. This, Jane dear, is the program 
of the delightful production "Ever Since Eve", 



:>'V'>«r-iar'iar^>«>">w4B«^'"Wu«»»«'H \_, J 3.SS OT L / *t4 »l>«a»l)'^»<>«»(>«»l!'^»<>«»l>«»»«»ii«»u 



which was directed by Miss Esther Mehring. No 
better chairman could have been selected than con- 
scientious Victor Mangini, and his committee is 
also to be commended. Those appearing in the 
production were Vannie Raps, Shirley Porter, Vic- 
tor Mangini, Freeman Murphy, Carmela Costa, 
Laurie Haynes, Lillian White, George Greenway, 
Alden Mayo, and Wendell Martin. 

The final task of the nominating committee 
was to select candidates for Class Day Chairman. 
Yes, there is the committee: Ruth Omundsen, 
Joseph Giamo, Elmer Chisholm, Sadie Alesse, 
Robert Segien, George Stevenson, Lois Freeman, 
and Beverly Myers. The chairman whom the class 
elected was red-haired, unassuming Paul McHugh. 

I shall never forget Class Day, for to me it 
climaxed all the wonderful things High School 
had given me — laughter, tears, deep thoughts, 
treasured acquaintances, and remembrances which 
I have always cherished. The Class Will was 
written and read by Gene Sharpies; the Prophecy, 
by Victor Mangini; and the History, by Beverly 
Myers. These words spoken by our class historian, 



so many years ago, have remained with me, and 
I like to pass them on to you. She said 

"Fellow graduates, tomorrow out of a class of 
455 boys and girls, 249 will be graduated. We, 
that remain, have been living in a protecting, 
warm glass house called childhood, at the end of 
a sturdy bridge. On the other side of this bridge 
lies the strange forbidding land of Maturity. To- 
morrow, graduation day, the door of our glass 
house will slide open ; each day we will go a little 
farther across the bridge of Experience until we 
have reached the land of Maturity. From thar 
day onward, we shall have to shoulder our own 
burdens and bear our own responsibilities. All 
our days in childhood will be but fond memories, 
and we can never again return to the little glass 
house across the bridge, except perhaps, in 
dreams." 

So, Janie, my dear, treasure your high school 
days. Each moment was really a joy. Now, be 
a good girl and put the book away, for Granny 
is tired; and perhaps we shall look into the album 
again next year. 

Beverly Myers. 



THIS SPRING 

Spring trips blithely as ever this year — 

The orchard's a square of pink froth from here, 

Where just last May we laughed, together, dear. 

The wind is soft and cool upon the hill; 

A gentle child a-tugging at my hair; 

I gathered pussy-willows by the mill 

For that fine cracked blue vase — you'd like them 

there — 
And I found again that shaded wood bridge 
Where the spring runs cool, and we waded; 
I wore the same light green print you liked — - 
And green is in the meadow now 
That days ago was drear. 
Though it's worn and tattered and faded, 
The spring is a season forever sweet 
To those who walk now together and glad, 
But for those apart or like me bereaved 
The May bears memories achingly sad. 

Betty Ryan. '44. 



♦S»" 



,, — «h — . — —..Class of 1944 »>-™»«~. «~_ 



Class Highlights 




SENIOR PLAY COMMITTEE 
F?"o«/ JRow: Joanne Johnson, Hazel Dunbrack, Victor Mangini, chairman; 

PrisciDa Woodward, Mary Eaton, Byla Riseberg 

Back row: Freeman Murphy, Alden Mayo, Alisca Cullen, Marie O'Hare, 

Robert Bruce, Wendell Martin 




CAST OF THE SENIOR PLAY "EVER SINCE EVE" 

presen'ed on Friday evening, April 21, by the Class of 1944 under the 

faculty direction of Miss Esther Mehring: 

Front Row: Carmela Costa and Vannie Raps 

Second Row: Shirley Porter, Miss Esther Mehring, and Laurie Haynes 

Third Row: William Winberg, Freeman Murphy, Lillian White and 

Alden Mayo 
Top Row: George Greenway, Wendell Martin, and Victor Mangini 






>^'(>^<m»0'^H>«»t>'«»l>'«»<1«»O'^O4B»(>.^0<\^,J_3.SS Or X^/44 ►"■—*"'^"'^"'— ■■'•^"^"^"■^»'^l>^l>.^) M I M »»♦ 




SENIOR DANCE COMMITTEE 

K^wr i?<?;< : Victor Mangini, Robert Bruce, Freeman Murphy. 

Bill Smith, chairman 
Front Row. Dorothy McKenna, Marie O'Hare, Vannie Raps, 

Marjorie Wyman 




STUDENT DIRECTORS OF THE 1944 YEARBOOK 

Front Row. Robert Bruce and Evelyn Uberti, 

Editor s-in-Cbiej 

Back Row. Alexander Wenckus, Advertising Manager; 

Flora DAngio, Business Manager; 

John Cobb, Art Editor 



^,— »..•—■(.— »—"^»-^«-»"— ►»—►»■•"'■— ►««•»•••"< C_vl3.SS Ol 1 y 44 *"~ *"—'>• 



IWMKWuaBiivuwuwoiBil*,)*,^^.;, 




CLASS DAY SPEAKERS 

Beverley Myers, Historian; Victor Mangini, Prophet; 
Gene Sharpies, Writer of Class Will 




CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 

John Walker 

Front Row: Doris Henderson, Constance Waterhouse 

Back Row. Paul McHugh, chairman; Teresa Mase, 







CANDIDLY SPEAKING 



_■ _»—«—. .:—«_ o—..— ClaSS Of 1944 ">— o— o— 0*-H»-K^KK-.0^O^O 




WALTHAM HIGHLIGHTS 



™— >_,, Class of 1944 



Class Will 



1 



GENE 
Writer 



Agp E it remembered that we, 
the Class of 1944, being of 
sound and disposing mind 
and memory and wishing to 
direct in what manner our 
possessions shall be disposed 
of after our departure, do 
make and publish this, our 
last will and testament. After 
the payment of our just 
debts, we bequeath and de- 
vise as follows: 

To Mr. Goodrich, Captain 
of the good ship U. S. S 
Waltham High, who has ^' 
loted us safely through the 
past three years, we offer our 
salute for his ability, per- 
formance, and personal interest in the crew. 

To Mr. Ward. Senior Class Adviser, and one 
of our most beloved teachers, we bestow an 
"oscar" which we feel he deserves as a most ac- 
complished actor. The theatre lost another Barry- 
more, to the great delight of the students, when 
he decided to teach "Hamlet" and "Macbeth" 
rather than act the title roles on the stage. 

To Miss Mehring, the faculty adviser of the 
Dramatic Club, we leave another Freeman Murphy 
and a full cast of male actors, who will probably 
cause her more than one headache, but who 
should make the Dramatic Club more popular 
than ever. 

To Mr. Leary, better known as Jack, that foot- 
ball coach who makes muscles out of jelly with 
his well-known monkey drill, we leave fond 
memories of a dream at last come true. 

To Mr. Sheehy, our teacher of biology, whose 
collection of pickled grasshoppers, horseflies, bees, 
and dissected frogs would scare any Inner Sanc- 
tum author, we leave an extra package of paper 
so that the talkative students may keep him in- 
formed of their knowledge of the functions of 




SHARPLES 
of Class Will 



the plant and animal king- 
doms. 

To Miss Viets, the capable 
adviser of the literary de- 
partment of the Mirror, we 
offer our thanks for the long 
hours she has spent making 
our graduation issue such a 
success. We suggest that she 
take a supply of vitamin pills 
and a long rest before tack- 
ing next year's work. 

To Mr. Mosher, who, this 
next year, will begin his new 
duties as football manager 
and who doubtless will be 
buried under huge mathemat- 
ical figures, we bestow a 
ledger in which gate receipts may be recorded. 

To the Class of 1945 we proudly present the 
formula for a financially successful Senior Dance. 

We hereby nominate Mr. Reynolds, Mr. 
Hodge, and Mr. Garrahan, all of Waltham, 
County of Middlesex and Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as co-executors of this, our last 
will and testament. In testimony whereof we 
hereunto set our hand and in the presence of three 
witnesses declare this to be our last will this 
seventh day of June in the year one thousand, nine 
hundred and forty-four. 

Class of 1944 
Gene Sharples. 



Signed and sealed and published by the said 
Class of 1944 as and for their last will and 
testament in the presence of 

Miss Marion Frost 
Miss Dorothy Hyde- 
Miss Margaret Nolan 



♦Class of 1944 



Codicil to the Last Will and Testament: 



To Whom It May Concern: 

Be it remembered that we, the Class of 1944. 
being of sound and disposing mind and memory, 
and wishing to direct in what manner our estate 
shall be disposed of after our departure, do make 
and publish this, the codicil to our last will and 
testament, hereby ratifying and confirming said 
will in all respects except as changed by this 
instrument. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Mary Lou 
Macdonald to be executrix of this our last will 
and testament, and we hereby request that she 
be exempt from furnishing any surety or sureties 
of her official bond. 

To Victor Mangini, our most popular boy and 
the one most likely to succeed, who is chairman 
of practically every committee and has countless 
numbers of friends, we leave this feather cushion 
to sit on when he is the Governor of Massachu- 
setts. If by any chance such good fortune should 
not come his way, it may be useful in warding 
off some of life's hard knocks. 

Beverly Myers is that little miss with the win- 
ning smile and golden voice who has personality 
plus and is also our most popular girl. To her 
wc leave a box for her family to occupy at her 
Metropolitan Opera debut with the condition that 
one corner will always be reserved for fans from 
Waltham High, who will certainly follow her 
career with interest and enthusiasm. 

Our classmate, Evelyn Uberti has been a per- 
fect example of the studious student and the one 
most likely to succeed. We leave Evelyn a model 
of the cap and gown we feel sure she will be 
called upon to wear many times throughout the 
years when receiving honorary degrees from lead- 
ing universities. 

Tall, blond, and handsome William Richard 
walked away with the honor of being voted the 
best looking boy. In case his devastating quali- 
ties cause the feminine population to mob this 
juvenile Apollo, we leave him an identification 
bracelet. 



To the best looking girl in the Senior Class, 
or in any other, as far as we are concerned, Ruth 
Omundscn, who, we believe will be the top 
Powers' model in the near future, we leave a bnr 
of a well-known product to preserve that school- 
girl complexion and to keep the cameras clicking. 

To the Esquire of the class, Joseph Giamo, the 
best dressed boy, we leave one of the latest fads, 
a Frank Sinatra bow tie. "We trust he will use 
discreton and limit the number of his appearances 
in this creation. Swooning should not be en- 
couraged on our main streets. 

To our court jester, Freeman Murphy, the class 
wit who stole the show in the Dramatic Club's 
presentation of "Elmer and the Love Bug" and 
whose hilarious antics keep his admirers in con- 
stant stitches, we leave an edition of "Jabber 
Wacky" so that his jokes will be "hep" and not 
pure "corn." 

To that carbon copy of Mademoiselle, Laura 
Viscoglio.si, whose distinctive taste and individu- 
ality have made her the best dressed girl, we be- 
queath the v-ery latest thing in repair kits, some- 
thing a well-dressed woman would never be 
without. 

To Marie O'Hare, our brightest social light, 
who graces so many gala occasions and whose ex- 
uberant energy knows no bounds, we leave this 
comb to avoid all danger of entangling alliances. 

To one of the star players of our Class A 
Championship football team, Walter Anderson, 
chosen as the most athletic boy, and whose 
prowess will surely carry him on through many 
another contest, we bequeath this scrapbook to 
keep the press records of his ever increasing fame. 

In order to maintain that condition of physcal 
fitness that entitled her to be voted the most 
athletic girl, .we leave Alisca Cullen this set of 
early morning exercises. 

To that outstanding glamour girl, Laurie 
Haynes, the damsel who has enough oomph to 
throw Hcdy LaMarr into a shadow, we present 
this jar of silver polish so that she may always 
have that bright and shining appearance. 



+ 






It is not often that a young man can be classi- 
fied most studious and still be "hep", but Alden 
Mayo is definitely one of the gang, and will re- 
main so even though his studies take him far 
afield. Who could miss those resplendent cravats, 
checkered shirts, and zebra socks. To Alden we 
leave this crystal ball in which he may solve all 
his future problems. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Miss Burgess, 
Mr. Hood, and Miss Darmedy as co-executors of 
this, the codicil to our last will and testament, 
and we hereby direct said executors to pay all our 
just debts and costs of administration out of our 
estate. We hereby request that they be exempt 
from any surety or sureties on their official bonds. 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hand 
and seal and publish and declare this to be the 



codicil to our last will and testament in the pres- 
ence of the witnesses named below this seventh 
day of June A. D. 1944. 

The Class of 1944 
Gene Sharples. 

On this seventh day of June A. D., 1944, Gene 
Sharpies for the Class of 1944 of Waltham, 
Massachusetts, signed the foregoing instrument in 
our presence, declaring it to be their last wili; 
and thereafter as witnesses we three at their re- 
quest, in their presence and the presence of each 
other, hereunto subscribe our names. 

Thelma L. Eaton 
Almon W. Morang 
Lilla E. Clement 



ALWAYS READY 

We've put away our books now, 

Our bigger job's begun. 
For twelve long years we've studied, 

Laughed, joked, and had our fun. 

But now we're on our own, 

To learn the ways of life, 
To face what comes; we'll not turn back, 

Be it peace, or love, or strife. 

Our teachers have done all they can, 

Now it's up to us, 
We'll finish this job of war and hate 

With very little fuss. 

After this is over, our job is going to be, 

To have our people laugh and dance 
In a country really free. 

Ann MacDonald, '44. 



i— — Class of 1944 — — 



Class Prophecy 



1&- 



HE time is a few years 
after World War II. Peace 
has definitely come to our 
temperamental world. People 
are going for long Sunday 
drives and picnics. Men 
come home from a day's 
work to dig into a juicy two 
pound steak swimming in 
gobs of butter. To jo and 
Adolph have joined their an- 
cestors, and F. D. R. is keep- 
ing quiet on his sixth-term 
chances. 

The place is the sumptuous 
office of the editor of the 
New York Times. Your cor- 
respondent is slumped into a 
big red leather chair, my feet propped up on the 
huge glass-topped mahogany desk. Just as I'm 
bcgnning to feel comfortable, who rushes into 
the office but the editor-in-chief himself, Bob 
Bruce, who, as you all know, began his journal- 
istic career at dear old W. H. S. 

"How many times have I told you to stay out 
of my office and leave my best cigars alone?" he 
yells. "Just because your vacation begins today, 
you don't have to start it in my office. Where do 
you intend going for your rest anyway?" 

"Well, I guess I'll go to that popular resort 
over in the Sahara Desert and get away from it 
all," I said sickly. "I understand a lot of my old 
school chums are there for the same reason." 

"Well," thunders Bruce, "you can get your 
check from my trusty secretary, Dot McKenna; 
then clear out!" 

In a few minutes I am off to say goodbye to 
the office staff. First, down to my other boss, 
the managing editor, Alien "Deadline" Mayo. 
Then across the hall to that charming society ed- 
itor, Beverly Myers, who, by this time has been 
chosen "Woman most likely to succeed Mrs. 




VICTOR MANGINI 
Writer of Class Prophecy 



Roosevelt." Over to the staff 
artist, John "Inky" Cobb, 
and his dynamic "idea man." 
Bob Olney, who has enough 
medals on his legion uniform 
to sink a ship. 

I don't forget the office 
girls, Lorraine Basley, Mar- 
garet De Meo, Marion Zaia, 
and Mary Tomasells of the 
bookkeeping department. I 
try to persuade them to come 
on vacation with me, but they 
laugh it off saying that their 
work is too interesting to 
leave. 

With the goodbyes taken 
care of, I leave the building 
and saunter over to Broadway. It is a beauti- 
ful summer day, so I decide to walk to the air- 
port. As I'm crossing a busy intersection, a 
sleek black limousine streaks by and almost nips 
the buttons off my coat. Just as I thought, the 
laughing face in the window is that of "Playboy" 
Bob Guiney with his chauffeur, John Shea. John 
recently got his pilot's license. This probably 
explains why the four wheels of the car were off 
the ground. 

Once safely on the sidewalk, I start my survey 
of historic Broadway. Wait a minute! There 
is Gene Clark getting his shoes shined. Eugene, 
after traveling the country in a circus as a strong- 
man, now has a sparkling juggling act in New 
York vaudeville, where he can jump around and 
twitch to his heart's content. It is not only 
Eugene I'm looking at, it's also the bootblack, a 
pitiful sight indeed. Poor Frank Sinatra! Once 
the toast of the music world he has been reduced 
to utter poverty ever since Bob Lally became the 
number one "Swooner crooner" of the land. 
Well, at least Bob has real muscles and can play 
a beautiful game of golf. I want to stop off at 



Class of 1944 



my favorite rendezvous "Colletto's Cabaret," but 
I really haven't the time. Anyway, Joe has been 
in a bad mood since his glamorous hostess, Laurie 
Haynes, left to work at the Ritz Carleton. I guess 
she wanted to be with Lois Freeman, who is the 
efficient head nurse at the famous hostelry. 

After strolling along a while, I reach the theatre 
district and stop before a huge billboard that 
reads: Richard "Orson" Mongeon presents — 
"GRIDIRON LOVE AFFAIR, OR YOU HAVE 
TO BE A FOOTBALL HERO" STARRING 
THAT SENSATIONAL NEW STAGE TEAM, 
PAUL MCHUGH AND MILDRED BENNETT. 
COSTUMES DESIGNED BY PAT ROBINSON 
AND MUSIC BY MAESTRO FRANK FLOOD. 
"I'll have to see that when I get back," I muse 
as I stride regretfully away. 

just then I realize that I have only a few 
minutes to get to the airport, so I dash to the 
nearest cab and jump in. "Airport," I bellow, 
but the driver does not stir from his sound sleep. 
It isn't until I give him a little shake that he 
wakes up and turns around. "Joe Giamo!" I stam- 
mer. "Get me to the airport prompto, and mean- 
while tell me all about yourself!" And so on we 
speed talking over old times. Only once do we 
stop. It's for a clanging, thundering fire engine 
with Elmer C his holm and Pete Colin r a perched 
up on the front seat and Billy Richard, Johnny 
Walker, and Ray Parker hanging on the back with 
their raincoats flapping in the wind. They are 
followed by the fire chief himself, Rudolf Peritli. 
(Rudy didn't have to be so sarcastic and stick his 
nose up in the air as he sped by) . 

I nrraculously reach the airport in one piece 
and pay Joe his fare. There I am met by a pilot, 
Alike Koulopoulos, who, after resigning as ad- 
miral of the Pacific Fleet, bought this airport as 
a hobby. As we walk to the runway, Mike tells 
me about a few of the people that work there — 
including his other pilots, Harry Tapply, John 
Do.ro;?, and Bob Everett. He says something 
abou" grease-monkies and mentions Terry Mc- 
Govern, Wally MacDougall, and Ray Ryan. The 
reason I'm not listening is that a group of host- 
esses:; stride by led by Muriel Landry, followed 



by Muriel Brenner, Lorraine Blunt, Carmela Costa, 
and Edna Delaney. 

Once seated in the B-19, which is Mike's fa- 
vorite plane, I am surprised to see Bemie Nussi- 
now and Eddie Johnson. "Where are you headed, 
boys?" I ask. 

"We're going to join Larry Cole in Germany: 
he's making big money in the reconstruction 
business." 

"Well, I'm glad I have some one to talk to on 
the trip across," I reply. So we talk over old 
times. Bernie tells me, in his colorful way, about 
the different boys that made good in the service; 
boys like Art Ritchie, who became a marine gen- 
eral and Chet Page, who did quite a business in 
the paratroopers making shorts out of old para- 
chutes. Bill Smith got quite a bit of fame after 
he captured a fat Japanese general with a beauti- 
ful "Leary" tackle. Bill had pity on the embar- 
rassed Nip Commander; so when no one was 
looking, he slipped him a special hara-kiri sword 
to pur the poor soul out of his misery. Jimmy 
Gomiely and George Hatfield like the navy so 
much that they tried to be the first to make a trip 
around the world in a rowboat! Amy Florio, 
Harold Kenny, and Leigh Woodward all met in 
Casablanca one day and had the swellest time 
looking for In grid Bergman! I guess all the boys 
of the class of "44" made quite a name for them- 
selves in the service. 

We finally landed at an airport near the resort 
after letting Bernie and Doug off at Lisbon. After 
b : dding farewell to Mike, I look for a cab to take 
me to the hotel, but nary a one is in sight, only 
camels. Searching for a policeman to give me 
directions, I eventually see one in a dusty square 
just outside the airdrome. 

"Pardon me, could you tell me where the hotel 
nearest to the Sahara Resort is located?" I ask, 
tapping him on the shoulder. 

"Sure," he replies, "it's just down the highway 
about — Vic! Don't you remember your old 
pal, Al Rodenhizer?" 

"Gosh, Al, I didn't recognize you with that 
turban and your tan." 



™ — .Class of 1944 > 



Following a short chat with Al, who tells me 
confidentially that he is still wearing his basket 
ball uniform under his patrolman's outfit, I set 
off down the highway to the hotel. 

After walking for a short distance, I encounter 
a small group of natives gathered around a huge 
giant of a man dressed as an Arab selling homo- 
genized camel's milk. The familiar face is that 
of Wally Anderson. It seems that the camel's 
milk not only is fortified with vitamins but also 
has a secret ingredient that is guaranteed to grow 
hair on the baldest man alive. After buying a 
bottle, I continued on my way. I haven't gone 
far when I hear a loud "honk" behind me. As 
I turn around, I see what might be called a car, 
loaded down with trunks. Who are the tired but 
happy travelers? None other than Dick Tinglof, 
Gene Sharpies, Bill Meyer, Hazel Dunbrack, Carl 
Scafidi, and ]ean Crocker. "If you're going to 
Shepheard's Hotel, hop in," yelled Bill (knowing 
all along there was no room) , but I fool him by 
clambering onto the roof of the poor over-loaded 
vehicle. After a few backfires we chug merrily on 
our way, singing that old favorite, "Give a Cheer 
for Waltham." 

When we finally reach the hotel patio, Bill 
yells, "O. K., Vic. You can stop pushing now. 
We're there!" Stumbling up the stairs and crawl- 
ing to the desk I suddenly pass out from exhaus- 
tion. When I awake I am in the arms of an en- 
chanting blond who smiles and strokes my fevered 
brow. "Ruth Omundsen!" I mumble. "How 
long have you been in heaven? Where's Saint 
Peter?" 

Ruth laughs. "You're not in heaven; you're 
in my hotel. Do you feel strong enough to go 
to your room? I'm sorry I can't get someone to 
carry you there, but only women are employed 
here." 

"I guess I can make it." I reply tiredly. 

Arising from the couch, I survey the lobby of 
the hotel and find it full of familiar faces. Over 
there at the desk is Mary Eaton talking to a tall 
handsome Arab chieftain. Behind the candy 
counter sampling the sweets are Barbara Hession 
and Irene Erickson. Clad in bright red and gold 



uniforms are Marilyn Powers, Barbara Kelly, and 
Eleanor Brown, supposedly efficient bell girls, but 
they are at the soda fountain enjoying huge ice 
cream sodas. At this point Beverley Cousins 
strides by dressed in a pretty riding habit. I guess 
she must have brought that noble steed of hers, 
"Aristocrat", along on vacation too! After seeing 
Aloyse Martin and Eena Dagostino amble by 
dressed for a game of tennis, I feel my strength 
return — enough so that I'm able to make my 
way to the elevator where Hazel Balcom is the 
smiling operator. 

After a restful nap and a cool shower I meander 
through the hotel looking for a barber shop. I 
finally spy one displaying the sign: PAT MULA'S 
CLIP SHOP - - I HAVE AN EXCELLENT SE- 
LECTION OF BOWLS TO FIT EACH DIS- 
TINCTIVE SHAPE OF HEAD. I'm about to 
enter when out stomps Joe Powers red as a beet, 
but no wonder! His head is shaved as clean as 
a billiard ball. Before I enter I peer in and see 
Pat and his assistant John Mullaney bending ovet 
with laughter. Will Vincent and Bob Higgins, 
who are in the chairs, don't look very comfortable. 

Abandoning the idea of getting a haircut, I de- 
cide to go for a walk. Not far from the hotel I 
hear some yelling and cheering. Seeing a crowd 
of people watching a girl's softball game, I draw 
near and find that it's a team comprised of former 
'44 girls playing against a team of Arab lassies. 
Out on the pitcher's mound is 'Fireball' Alisca 
Cullen. Her very capable catcher is Marilyn 
Abom, who keeps yelling words of encouragement 
like, "Come on, Alisca. We can still win this 
game. What's 120 runs!" 

The discouraged team includes Ann MacDon- 
ald, sitting on first base combing her hair, and 
Margaret Doucette who is talking to the shortstop, 
Mildred King. Beatrice Ferguson "occupies" 
third base while catching up on her knitting. 
Ellena Mickalsen, Eleanor Shedd, and Ruth Hay- 
den, the energetic outfielders, are enjoying a 
sunbath. Umpire Sadie Alesse is setting 
coach Mary Morabeto's hair. All the girls are 
here resting after serving as WACS or WAVES 
in the great war. 



«— _,_. _„Class of 1944 



I have no desire to see any more of the "game," 
so I continue on my way. As I'm walking, I feel 
a tickle in my ribs and, being ticklish, I burst out 
laughing. As I turn around, I see that it's the 
nose of a bleary-eyed camel. The exhausted 
desert beast is just plodding along, but no wonder! 
Ethel O'Neill, Ruth Powers, and Mary Wells are 
parched under a striped canopy on top of its ach- 
ing back. You'd think that being the wives of 
Arab chieftains, each one would have a camel, 
but each seems to enjoy prodding this particular 
c.imel on. They won't even get off and "walk a 
mile for it." 

After stumbling along for quite a while over 
the trackless sand dunes, I come upon a small 
pyramid. I am about to walk right by, but I 
hear the faint strains of some weird oriental 
music. Walking into the open stone door, I be- 
hold before my astounded, unbelieving eyes, seat- 
ed on huge satin pillows, George Freeman Mur- 
phy! "Murph" is blowing on a tiny horn in front 
of a swaying snake, rising out of a wicker basket, 
lie hastens to explain that he made his home in 
the deserted pyramid after he found that he didn't 
1 ke all the women who were back at the hotel. 
\7e were served a bountiful meal by part of his 
huge "staff;" namely, Marie O'Hare, Marjorie 
Y/yman, and Joanne Johnson! I bid Freeman 
good bye before he suggests that I stay and live 
with him. 

When I finally reach the hotel, I decide to 
take a dip in the pool. In a few minutes I am 
in my bathing trunks beside the beautiful colored- 
tile enclosure. Before I dive in, I make survey 
of the people who are gathered around the pool. 
Bernice Noseworthy, Marguerite Ohnemus, and 
Marjorie Hunter are watching swimming instruct- 
or Shirley Porter skim back and forth over the 



water. Shirley, incidentally, is not allowed to 
compete in swimming races any more because the 
judges refuse to believe that she does not use an 
outboard motor. 

Oa the opposite side are Laura Viscogliosi and 
Rose Taranto, who are sunning themselves while 
reading the latest movie magazines, even though 
they are already as brown as chocolate. The only 
men I notice are grouped in a corner, taking turns 
throwing queer square marbles on the ground. 
It seems natural to see that they are George Nel- 
son, Eric Frank, and Paul Drury. 

After dipping my toe into the water and find- 
ing it too cold, I put on my clothes and go to the 
soda fountain. There I observe Theresa Sicotte, 
Loretta Douglas, and Helen Landsdowne all 
grouped together sharing the same small "coke." 
The soda girl, Esther Favre, tells me that she even 
had to put the drink "on the cuff." I drink my 
coke and then go to the lounge. I am soon ap- 
proached by Evelyn Uberti, who carries a book 
entitled "Dynamic Physics." 

"Victor," she says plaintively, "could you tell 
me if the differential coefficient of the dissecting 
hypotenuse equals the square root of this par- 
allelogram?" 

"Why, of course, Evelyn," I reply holding back 
my smile as she bustles away obviously pleased. 

At that moment Vannie Raps and Mary Buck- 
ley approach. "Hey, Vic," they yell as they grab 
my arm, "the girls are having a dance in the ball- 
room, and we are short of men, so we will take 
anything. Come on!" 

"O. K.," I reply eagerly. But just at the mo- 
ment the piercing notes of a bugle drift to my 
ears. It's the "lovable" army bugler. "He would!" 
I mumble as I turn over. "Just as I was in the 
mood for a rhumba!" 

Victor Mangini. 



Class of 1944 



SCMOLl 

ACTMJIES 




•Class of 1944 




THOSE WHO SERVE IN WALTHAM HIGH'S CAFETERIA 






o* ,«J 




Ca}. Wonkeh 







Class of 1944 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 
The beautiful snapshot of the Capitol in Wash- 
ington, D. C, heading the Service page was taken 
personally by our chief staff photographer, Harold 
Whitney, '46. 

Among the sport shots is the excellent picture 
of Al Rodenhizer and the two New Bedford co- 
captains of basketball. This was taken on the 
second ni&ht of the Tech Tournament in the 

o 

Boston Garden by Kenneth Heinz, 46, another 
one of our photographic staff. 

The Mirror wishes to express its appreciation 
to Mr. Gene Mack, famous cartoonist of the 
Boston Globe, for allowing us to reproduce the 
two football cartoons used in this issue. They 
will help us to remember always our great 1943 
championship football team. 

The courtesy of the Waltham News-Tribune is 
also duly acknowledged for providing us with the 
athletic action pictures and team photographs. 
Thank you, News-Tribune! You've always been 
ready to help, and we are grateful! 




SCENES BEHIND THE MIRROR 
Since it may be very interesting to our readers 
to know how a Mirror is compiled, we are going 
to take you behind the scenes and show you what 
must be done to get out a school magazine. Most 
of you know what the Literary Committee does — 
reading countless manuscripts to select the ones 
suitable for Mirror material, seeing that everyone 
has a "write-up" for the year book, compiling 
various sections of the magazine and running 
around on countless errands. This year Hazel 
Balcom suggested an innovation in the year book 
— a quotation with every "write-up." Great 
credit must be given to those members of the 
Literary Staff who spent hours looking up suitable 
quotations for those who didn't have any. We 
also wish to thank those pupils who cooperated 
by looking up the quotations that were assigned 
to them. 

The Art Department, as all of you know, has 
a great part in the success of a magazine. This 
year there have been new cartoons and a general 
face-lifting of the issue by John Cobb, the art 
editor, and his assistants, Gene Sharpies, Bardon 
Wellcome, and Alden Mayo. This issue itself 
will show the amount of work that they have con- 
tributed to make it a success. 



Last but not least, we introduce you to the 
Business Staff upon which depends the financial 
success of the Mirror. This staff collects all the 
advertising material and camera shots, takes orders 
for the magazine, and handles all financial affairs. 
This year there is a greater amount of advertising 
than ever before. Winners of the advertising 
contest are Lois Coolidge, who secured eleven 
"ads," and Adele Waldman, who secured nine. 
The chief photographer, Harold Whitney, who 
has been taking pictures all year deserves a great 
deal of credit for his hard work. The business 
and advertising managers, Flora D'Angio and 
Alexander Wenkus have labored unceasingly to 
handle all business affairs, and they deserve many 
thanks. The unsung heroes, the room agents, also 
must be mentioned if we are rightly to give credit 
where credit is due. Since there is not enough 
room on the front page for their names, we shall 
list them here, for truly, without their willingness 
to help, the Mirror would be a failure. 

Room Name 

03 Alden Mayo 

04 Donald Hartnett 

05 Gertrude Bohannon 
015 Elaine Ramsdell 
017 Joan Mo rang 

101 Laura Kenneson 

102 Ann MacDonald 

103 Howard Bettinson 

105 Marie O'Hare 

106 Louis Le Blanc 

107 Sarah Collura 
109 Joyce Bradford 

112 Robert Lally 

113 Janet Duddy 

114 George Nelson 

115 Edith Horton 

117 Bruce Hamilton 

118 Gene Sharpies 
201 Eleanor Jacobs 
203 Marion Hemeon 

205 Ernest Zeno 

206 Pauline Cormier 

207 William Buckley 

211 Janice Myers 

212 Weldon Hitchcock 

213 Marilyn Gowell 

214 Francis Corcoran 

215 Isabelle MacKenzie 

216 Jean Tewksbury 

217 Raymond Yamartino 

218 William Frarey 
307 Elliot Hansen 
406 Barbara Dunn 






«.;♦ 



F1{ESH^MAN -SOPHOJMORE - JUNIOR 

CLASS OFFICERS 





FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 
Back Row: Richard Frank, Vice-President 

Thomas Pinzone, President 
Front Row. Marilyn Gowell, Sec. -Ureas. 
Freda McLaughlin, Auditor 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Rear Row: Walter Keyes, Auditor 
Ernest Zeno, President 
Front Row: 

Fay Wenckus, Vice-President 

Sally Mosher, Secretary 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 
Rear Row. John Rooney, Auditor 

Robert Driscoll, President 
Front Row: Barbara Pearson, Vice-President 
June Kelly, Secretary-Treasurer 



.,__,^ ^„- ^o-,,_.,<Class of 1944 



>^= >0'0^>ii^-'iflB-ijic>ii^.iiC>!i-S='.)<^i'<X>uC»<»^ 




CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Sheehy, Juniors; Mr. Hollis Sophomores; 

Mr. Mosher, Freshmen 




^ iniii j n i w*iM>.«m» ll » l i < ».^wn)» M V> IciSS Ol X>/44 ►" — °^°^° ^ ° — ■» 




WALTHAM HIGH'S FIRST HONOR GROUP 

ALL A STUDENTS 

Rear Row: Raymond Yamartino, Marilyn Go well, Isabel Harpootlian, June 

Kelly, Evelyn Uberti, Jean Eberhard, Richard Clark 
Front Row. Paula Franchina, Betty Viles, Frances Barrow, Amelia Cardillo, 

Charlotte Leavy 





DRAMATIC CLUB OFFICERS 

1943 - 1944 

Renee Goldschmied, Vice-President, Freeman Murphy, President, 

Alisca Cullen, Sec-Treasurer 



Class of 1944 — 




WALTHAM HIGH CHEER LEADERS 
Front Row. Marjorie Jones, Ruth Christiansen, Phyllis LeShane 
Back Row: Bill Power, Vannie Raps, Vic Mangini 

Missing from picture are John Rooney and Richard Hart 




OUR TOP NOTCH DRUM MAJORETTES 

Back Row: Aloyse Martin and Isabel Paul 
Front Roiv: Virginia Oliveri and Ruth Powers 







*>-*M 



CRIMSON SPOTSHOTS 



SPORTS 








COACHES 
Mr. Walter Brinn, Hockey, Track 

Mr. John Leary, Football, Baseball 

Mr. Arthur Quinn, Basketball 




TEAM MANAGERS OF BOYS' SPORTS 
Rear: George Greenway, Hockey 
front: David Hansen, Basketball 

Charles Koulopoulos, Football 



.—Class of 1944- 



>o«»ii<»i>4 



FOOTBALL 



The Waltham High School 1943 Football Team 
was the most successful in more than three 
decades. This year's record of eleven victories, 
no defeats, and no ties is the best since 1907, 
when a Waltham eleven went through a season 
with thirteen victories, no defeats, and no ties. 
Waltham's schedule was one of the toughest in 
schoolboy circles, eight Class A clubs and three 
Class B clubs, which accounted for their winning 
the Eastern Massachusetts Class A Championship 
over Melrose, who did not play such strong teams. 

The Waltham "Wildcats" gained well-earned 
respect from sportswriters and fans by defeating 
mighty Everett and powerful Medford on succes- 
sive Saturdays, a feat very seldom accomplished. 
Also they gained very much satisfaction for them- 
selves by walloping arch-rival, Newton, 21 to 
and rolling over their traditional Thanksgiving 
Day rival, Brockton, by a score of 19 to 0. 

This 1943 team was noted for its fight and 
ability to work together as one body and its will 



to win. The fight they showed in the Everett 
game against a bigger and heavier foe earned 
praise from everyone who saw the game. 

Our backfield, led by right halfback Tony 
Romano, a wonderful ball-carrier, left-handed 
passer, expert place-kicker, and defensive back, 
was one of the most versatile backfields in local 
schoolboy ball. With Bob Driscoll at quarter- 
back, Bill Smith at left halfback, Tony Romano at 
right halfback, and Ernie Zeno at fullback, the 
backfield had four men, each of which could run 
or pass with nearly equal ability, preventing its 
opponents from concentrating on one back to 
halt the Waltham attack. Ernie Zeno, a fine line- 
plunger and forward passer, was an ideal fullback 
and along with Bill Smith won the Arlington 
game by throwing a pass which the latter caught 
and ran half the length of the field for the only 
score of the game. Bob Driscoll, a smart quarter- 
back, was an excellent passer and pass-receiver as 
well as a good open-field runner and Bill Smith, 




A section of the overflow crowd which was present at the Waltham - Everett football game at 

the Athletic Field, October 31, 1943. Waltham won its greatest victory of the season 7 - 6 by 

virtue of Romano's pass to Driscoll and Tony's unerring point after. 



+. 



•Class of 1944 — 



shifty left-halfback, excelled as both a ball-carrier 
and a pass-receiver. Mike Koulopoulos, smart 
reserve quarterback, good passer, and pass-receiver, 
Eugene Clarke, reserve left halfback and shifty 
runner, and Dick Stumpf, reserve right halfback 
and left-footed place-kicker were the very capable 
substitutes. 

The line, paced by Sal Rizzo, star right-tackle, 
offensive blocker, and defensive lineman, was one 
of the hardest charging, hardest tackling h'nes in 
the state and charged together like a solid walk 
Walter Anderson, Bill Furdon, Paul Ferrestre, 
Eddie Bowler, Art Merowitz, Paul McHugh, Sal 
Rizzo and Ernie Finan all charging together. 
Walter Anderson was a star punter and good de- 
fensive end. Joseph Colletto, Roger Robinson, 
Harold Clark, Pat Fitzgerald, Stan Shapiro and 
Al Rodenhizer were reserves. 

Sal Rizzo and Tony Romano were honored with 
first-string positions on many all-star teams by 
Boston sportswriters. Ernie Zeno, Tony Romano ; 
and Walter Anderson played for the Suburban 
All-Stars at Lynn against the Essex All-Stars. The 



Waltham team received the Fred O'Brien trophy, 
a plaque and individual medals at the Boston 
Sportswriters' Banquet at the Hotel Lenox. At 
(he Testimonial at the Hovey Memorial, the first 
thirteen men were given Waltham wristwatches, 
the twenty-four lettermen were given sports 
jackets, and the whole squad, gold engraved 
footballs. 

THE SCHEDULE 



\x 


/altham (. 


opponent? 


Rindge Tech 


19 


6 


Maiden 


14 





Leominster 


7 





Arlington 


6 





Haverhill 


12 





Lynn English 


28 





Everett 


7 


6 


Medford 


14 





Newton 


21 





Cambridge High and Latin 


27 





Brockton 


19 






Total 174 12 

Richard Whitcomb. 




THE WALTHAM WILDCATS — EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS STATE CLASS A FOOTBALL 

CHAMPIONS FOR 1943 — VICTORS IN 11 STRAIGHT GAMES 
B.ick Ron-: Tony Romano, r h b; Bob Driscoll and Mike Koulopoulos, quarterbacks; Ernie Zeno, 

fullback; Bill Smith, 1 h b. 

Front Rou : : Ernie Finan, r e; Sal Rizzo, r t; Paul McHugh, r g; Art Merowitz and Eddie 

Bowler, centers; Paul Terestre, 1 g; Bill Furdon, 1 t; Wallie Anderson, 1 e. 



Class of 1944 



mmm?7W) 



■.•'ijSS:V«:¥SS 




THAT GREAT 1943 BACKFIELD — ONE OF JACK LEARY'S BEST 
Tony Romano, r h. b. ; Bob Driscoll, q. b. ; Ernie Zeno, f. b. ; and Bill Smith, 1. ru b. 



!^^^§:^^5^^^^ 




Snow of Everett kicks booming punt caught by Bob Driscoll, Waltham quarterback and safety 
man. The Crimson signal caller ran the ball back ten yards on this play. 



.•.-»-.— »•—....■ » — •— <— ~~ «. _» _ . \^ J £1 §§ Qj 1 J/ 44 W>^0^0^l>^0«»0«»O.^n«»O«»O^»O 





Driscoll (No. 58) receiving 10 yard pass from Ernie Zeno. 
Bob was halted by No. 55, Zampell of Medford, as Bill 
Furdon (49) and Paul Terestre (76) look on. 



WALTHAM'S STAR BACK 
TONY ROMANO 



-.—.Class of 1944 ►•<>— »«*►<>——•„* 



"til ^2 




•Class of 1944 




•Class of 1944 




WALTHAM — BROCKTON GAME 

Thanksgiving Day 1943 

Paul McHugh, No. 36, leading interference for Tony Romano, that "Man from Mars," on an 

off-tackle play against our traditional Turkey Day rival. The net gain on this typical Romano 

smash was eight yards. 






THREE OF OUR GREAT 1943 BACKFIELD PERFORMERS 




KOULOPOULOS — 



Q. B. ZENO 

DRISCOLL — Q. B. 



— F. B. 




WALTHAM HIGH'S ATHLETIC TROPHIES 
Left to right: front row: 

Suburban League Basketball Championship ■ — 1944 
Eastern Mass. Class A Football Championship — 1943 

O'Brien Trophy — to be held for one year as emblem of Class A Football Supremacy — 1943 
Runner-up in Tech Tournament — Class A Basketball — 1944 
Suburban League Tennis Championship — 1941 

The two plaques in the background represent awards for leadership in football and the 
excellence of our Waltham High Band in playing and marching. 



Class of 1944——— 



BASKETBALL 




The Waltham High 1943-1944 Basketball 
Team was the most successful in the history of 
the school, for it went undefeated through its 
Suburban League schedule with twelve victories. 
It won four non-league tilts as well as two games 
in the Tech Tournament at the Boston Garden, 
but In the finals it lost to an exceptional Somer- 
ville five and so missed gaining the Eastern 
Massachusetts Championship. 

This Waltham High Basketball Team over- 
shadowed its opponents more decisively than any 
other team in the Suburban League in recent years. 
It beat the defending Suburban League champions 



from Newton twice: first, by only two points, 
and again, by six. It triumphed in the Tech 
Tournament over its arch-football rival, Brockton, 
by a score of 35 to 26, and beat New Bedforjd 
39 to 35 in overtime in the most exciting game 
of the season. Then, for the Eastern Massachu- 
setts Championship title, in a game broadcast over 
the radio, they played but could not defeat 
Somerville, one of the best teams of Greater 
Boston in recent years. 

The team consisted of a high-scoring six-foot 
center in Alvin Rodenhizer; a sharpshooting for- 
ward in Terry McGovern; a skillful little forward 
in Carlo Scafidi; a cool, keen-eyed guard in Bill 
O'Brien; and one of the best defensive guards in 
the Suburban League in Bob Lally. Roy Arbuth 
not, Carl Leaf, and Bob Driscoll were very capa- 
ble substitutes. Al Rodenhizer, Bill O'Brien, arid 
Bob Lally were named on the Tech Tourney All- 
Stars by several Boston Sportswriters. 

The hoopsters received sweaters from the Wal- 
tham Athletic Association, personal souvenir to- 
kens for being asked to the Tech Tourney, and a 
trophy for gaining the finals in the affair. 




VARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD — 1944 
Front Row. Terry McGovern, Al Rodenhizer, Coach Arthur Quinn, Bob Lally, Bill O'Brien, 

Carlo Scafidi 
Middle Row: Carl Leaf, Roy Arbuthnot, Mai Wetherbee, Johnny Walker, Howie Hunter 
Back Row. Dick Robinson, Walt Keyes, Roger Milligan, Gerry Dearborn, Alex Panda. 



Class of 1944—- 




WALTHAM HIGHS GREAT BASKETBALL TEAM, UNDEFEATED SUBURBAN LEAGUE 

CHAMPIONS AND DRUMMERS-UP IN THE 1944 TECH TOURNAMENT 

Carlo Scafidi, Bob Lally, Terry McGovern, Bill O'Brien, Roy Arbuthnot, Al Rodenhizer 



THE SCHEDULE 
NON-LEAGUE GAMES 



LEAGUE GAMES 



Maiden 
Beimont 
Belmont 
Trade School 



Waltham Opponents 
40 21 

52 35 

36 24 

60 17 



Total 188 



97 



TECH TOURNEY GAMES 

Waltham Opponents 
Brockton 35 26 

New Bedford 39 35 

Somerville 29 45 . 



Cambridge Latin 

Watertown 

Arlington 

Newton 

Rindge Tech 

Brookline 

Cambridge Latin 

Watertown 

Arlington 

Brookline 

Newton 

Rindge Tech 



Waltham Opponents 



10? 



106 



41 


23 


28 


23 


41 


25 


27 


25 


29 


18 


33 


18 


45 


22 


44 


28 


56 


24 


32 


16 


31 


25 


33 


25 


Total 440 


272 


Richard WHnqoMp. 



-Class of 1944 



HOCKEY 




The 1943-44 Waltham High School Hockey 
Team did fairly well in its season this year by 
winning four games, tying four games, and losing 
only two. The team came within seven minutes 
of winning the Bay State League Championship 
of the regular season in its seventh game, against 
Framingham, when after holding a one-to-noth- 
ing lead the majority of the game, went to piececs 
and let Framingham score three goals and deprive 
Waltham of the title. If Waltham had won this 
game, the Brown Trophy would have been ours 
but as they did not, Needham, which was beaten 
by Waltham received it. 

The team consisted of Harry Tapply, left wing; 
Bob Driscoll, center; Bill Smith, right wing: 
Walter Anderson, defenseman; Eddie Bowler, 
defenseman; and Bob Keith, goalie. Substitutes 
were Jimmy Bell, Paul Oullette, Bob Rier, Dick 



Stumpf, line Frank, John Nichols, and Joe Col- 
letto. Bob Driscol and Bob Keith were picked 
on the Bay State All-Star Team and both played 
very well in the games betwen the league all-stars, 
Driscoll getting two goals and two assists and 
Keith starring in the goal. Walter Anderson, 
Harry Tapply, and Bill Smith were chosen on the 
second team of the Bay State All-Stars but since 
the latter was unable to play Jimmy Bell played 
in his place. 

Bob Driscoll led the team in scoring with six 
goals and seven assists while Keith leel the league 
with a defensive record of fourteen goals scored 
against him. 



The schedule 






Regular season 


Waltham 


Opponents 


Nor woo 1 


2 





B. C. High 


3 


3 


Walpole 








Needham 


2 


1 


Watenown 


2 


1 


Wellcsley 


3 


1 


Framingham 


1 


3 


Playoff Games 


Waltham 


Opponents 


Framingham 


2 


2 


Walpole 


1 


2 


B. C. High 


1 


1 




Totals 17 


14 




VARSITY HOCKEY SQUAD — 1944 

Front Row: Jim Bell, Paul Ouellette, Edward Bowler, Bob Driscoll, Wally Anderson, Bob Keith 

Middle Row: John Nichols, Harry Waterhousc, Dick Stumpf, Irving Haynes, Dick Harriett 

Back Row: Richard Dugan, George Greenway, student manager, Eric Frank, Joe Collctto, John 

Smilh, Bob Rier, Richard Ham, Donald Keith, and Coach Waller 11. Brum 

Missing from picture — Bill Smith and Harry Tappley 



Mw^^MM. — -Class of 1944 ►<.——»—■» 

GIRLS* SPORTS 



BASKETBALL 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL CAPTAINS 

Iv.'arjorie Gardner, Sophomores ; Elsie Dorval, 

Juniors; Ann Castellano, Second Team; 

Alisca Cullen, First Team 

This year the Waltham High Girls' Basketball 
Team hit a new high by constantly outscoring its 
opponents. It must be remembered, however, 
that according to girls' rules guards are not al- 
lowed to score. 

WESTON AT WALTHAM 
Enthusiasm for girls' basketball was quite evi- 
dent when, on February 7, at the Weston game, 
a large number of spectators were present. The 
Weston girls looked "sharp" in their snappy ma- 
roon uniforms. "Tink" Mase, Waltham's "long- 
stemmed American beauty" was outstanding in her 
expert passing. Waltham's first team defeated 
59 to 27. 

G 
9 

16 
4 




Total 29 

The second team also beat the Weston lassies 
29 — 12, with Capt. Anna Castellano intercepting 
a lot of passes. Margie Gardner was high scorer 



Weston's first 

Waltham: 

Mase 

Alliseo 

Cullen 

Palumbo 

Cousins 

Kybert 

Christiansen 

Harpoothian 



The summary for 



F 

1 








1 



p 

19 


32 
8 




59 



with 13 points, 


and 


Elsie Dorval a 


close second 


with 10 points. 


The 


: summary 


G 


F P 


Cardillo 






3 


6 


Gardner 






6 


1 13 


Dorval 






5 


10 


Harnett 












Koundakjian 












Castellano 












Olney 












Newcomb 
















Totals 


14 


1 29 



WESTON AT WESTON 

The second Weston game took place on Febru- 
ary 17, with the Waltham girls chalking up an- 
other double win. 

That pert little red head from Lincoln, Bev. 
Cousins, was outstanding in her ability to inter- 
cept passes. 

It was much harder to defeat them this time 
as the "Weston-ers" were wise to many of our 
plays. 

Waltham's second team led by a slight margin 
all the way. In the fourth quarter they spurted 
ahead with Elsie Dorval getting 14 out of 28 
points. 

The first team won 46 — 37. The final score 
of the second team was 28 — 9. 

The first team line-up: 
Palumbo (F) 
Mase (F) 
Cullen (F) 
Aliseo (F) 
Kybert (G) 
Cousins (G) 
Christiansen (G) 
Harpoothian (G) 

Totals 

The second team line-up: 



Dorval 

Harnett 

Cardilio 

Gardner 

Castellano 

Koundakjian 

Newcomb 

Olney 



Totals 



G 

1 

2 
18 





21 

G 

7 
3 
1 
3 




14 



F 



1 

3 











4 

F 












P 

2 
5 

39 






46 

P 

14 
6 
2 
6 





28 



Class of 1944- 



■Hi 



p~ ' 



— ■ 









GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM, 1944 
Back Row. Elizabeth Harnett, Marjorie Gardner, Adele Koundakjian, 

Amelia Cardillo, Elsie Dorval, Anna Castellano Lorraine Olney 
Front Row: Mimi Aliseo, Ruth Christiansen, Teresa Mase, Gilda 
Palumbo, Alisca Cullen, Beverley Cousins, Barbara Kybert, 
Isabelle Harpootlian 



CAMBRIDGE-LATIN 

Waitham's first team scored a decisive victory 
over the Cambridge-Latin six. M. Dynan of 
Cambridge, with her unusually "dead eye", scored 
26 points for her team. The Cambridge lassies 
were small but elusive, and we had to move fast 
to keep ahead of them. The final score was 
61 — 37. The summary: G F P 

Aliseo (LF) 3 6 

Mase (RF) 4 8 

Palumbo (LF) 5 1 11 

Cullen (CF) 17 2 ' 36 

Cousins (CG) 

Christiansen (G) 

Harpoothian (RG) 

Kybert (LG) 

Totals 29 3 61 
JUNIOR — SOPHOMORE 

The Junior-Sophomore game was worth watch- 
ing. Both teams played hard and fast keeping 
the game exciting all the way. Captain Elsie 
Dorval was high scorer for the juniors with 
twelve points, while captain Margie Gardner 
was high scorer for the sophomores with seven 
points. Looks like it was a day for captains. 
The final score was 28 — 17 in favor of the 
juniors. 

JUNIORS 
Palumbo 
E. Dorval 
Aliseo 
Oliveri 
Harpoothian 
Christiansen 
Koundakjian 
Castellano 



SOPHOMORES 



Gardner 

Cardillo 

M. Dorval 

Harnett 

Olney 

Wenckus 

McKenzie 

Barrow 



G 

3 
1 
1 
3 







F 

1 










p 

7 
2 
2 
6 







SENIOR — SOPHOMORE 
The Senior girls gave the Sophomores quite a 
trouncing on March 9. The sophs put up a fight 
but it wasn't enough to defeat the experienced 
Seniors. 

Special mention should be made of Helen 
Landsdowne, Angy Demeo, and Dottie Henry, 
who played very well considering the fact that 
they had not had much practice. Barbara Kybert 
also deserves special mention; for, although all 
sca:on she played guard, in the two intra-mural 
games she played forward. The final score 
was 60 — 24. 



G 


F 


p 


senior line 


-up: 








4 





8 






G 


F 


P 


6 





12 


Mase (F) 




7 





14 


3 





6 


Kybert (F) 




4 





8 


1 





2 


Cullen (F) 




19 





38 











Cousins (G) 






















Henry (G) 






















Landsdowne 


(G) 




















Demeo (G) 




2 









Class of 1944 



For the Sophomores, Betty Harnett was high 
scorer with eight points. Margie Gardner and 
Amelia Andillo were next with six apiece. The 
Sophomore line-up: 





G 


F 


p 


Cardillo (CF) 


3 





6 


Gardner (RF) 


3 





6 


Harnett (LF) 


4 





8 


M. Dorval (RF) 


2 





4 


McKenzie (G) 











Barrow (G) 











Olney (G) 











Wenckus (G) 











SENIOR - 


- JUNIOR 







The Juniors suffered a hard blow dealt by the 
mighty Seniors in the final intra-mural game by 
which was decided the best team of the three 
classes. Of course the seniors won. The juniors 
played a hard game but were sorely conscious of 
their betters. Alisca Cullen was high scorer for 
the seniors with 48 points and Tink Mase second 
with 22. Gill Palumbo, master of a classy look- 
ing push-up shot, led the juniors in scoring with 
ten points followed by Elsie Dorval who scored 
eight. The summary: 

SENIORS 



Mase 

Cullen 

Kybert 

Landsdowne 

Henry 

Cousins 



Palumbo 

Dorval 

Aliseo 

Oliveri 

Castellano 

Harpoothian 

Koundakjian 

Christiansen 



Totals 
JUNIORS 



G 

11 
24 

1 






36 

G 

5 
4 
2 





11 



1 





1 















p 

23 
48 
2 



73 

P 

10 
8 
4 






22 



Totals 

VARSITY VS. ALUMNAE 
On Wednesday evening, March 15, a number 
of spectators were present to watch the Waltham 
High Girls' Varsity defeat the Alumnae. Al- 
though at first the score was close, the Varsity 
girls, who had had much more practice than the 
Alumnae, soon jumped in the lead through con- 
tinuous scoring by the "dead-eye" forwards, and 
won 55 — 15. The most outstanding player for 
the Varsity was Barb Kybert, guard, who was 
certainly "on the ball" every minute, not only 



intercepting passes but doing a good job of pass- 
ing herself. For the Alumnae, although she had 
not played for two years, Virginia Cullen stood 
out as a forward, scoring seven points out of 
fifteen. Edna Poirier followed closely with six 
points to her credit. Veniette Caswell did an ex- 
cellent job of guarding. The line-up follows: 
VARSITY 

Mase (RF) 
Cullen (RF) 
Palumbo (LF) 
Aliseo (LF) 
Cousins, (CG) 
Kybert (RG) 
Christiansen (G) 
Harpoothian (LG) 



G 


F 


p 


8 





16 


13 


1 


27 


4 





8 


2 





4 






































Totals 27 


1 


55 


ALUMNAE 






G 


F 


P 


3 


1 


7 











3 





6 


1 





2 






































Totals 7 


1 


15 



Cullen 

Agopian 

Poirier 

Castellano 

Caswell 

Williams 

Buckley 

Mitchell 



VOLLEY BALL 

A group of women teachers played the girls 
in volley ball on March 15. It was a close game 
all the way — the score being tied 16 — 16 at 
the end of the first half. 

Each side had a turn in the lead but in the 
last two minutes of play, the students, spurred on 
by the crack serving of Adele Koundakjian gained 
four points to win the game 31 — 28. Those 
participating were: 

Students 



Teachers 
Miss Bliss 
Miss Eaton 
Miss Hyde 
Miss Frost 
Miss Sewall 
Miss Stewart 
Mrs. Goodwin 
Miss Tribou 
Miss Hanna 
Mrs. Ford 



Newcomb 

Gardner 

Dorval, E. 

Dorval, M. 

McKenzie 

Castellano 

Cardillo 

Mosher 

Koundakjian 

Wenckus 

Barrow 

Harnett 

Wills 



. — —Class of 1944 



On Thursday, March 23, about thirty girls 
came out for volley-ball. We enjoyed ourselves 
but had a better time on Monday when we played 
on two courts with fewer girls on each side, We 
learned that team-work is an essential factor to a 
successful volley ball team. Soon class teams will 
be picked and then a battle will follow to see 
which team is the mightiest. There is also a 
game scheduled to meet our favorite rival, Weston. 



BADMINTON 

Towards the close of the badminton season, a 
latter tournament was held. Names were put in 
a hat and placed on the ladder in the order in 
which they were drawn. 

Twenty-five names were placed and keen com- 
petition followed. After a few weeks of playing, 
the final top ten were as follows: 



1. Alisca Cullen 6. 

2. Ruth Christiansen 7. 

3. Beverly Cousins 8. 

4. Phyllis Le Shane 9. 

5. Bea Koulopoulos 10. 



Isabel McKenzie 
Amelia Cardillo 
Janet Turner 
Lorraine Olney 
Frances Barrows 



BOWLING 

Every Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons the 
the Waltham High School girls went over to 
Brentwood alleys to try their skill at bowling. 
There were several girls who bowled high scores. 
The highest was "Tink" Mase with 112 closely 
followed by Shirley Porter with 111, and Beverly 
Cousins with 104. 

Those whose average was in the top five of 
Jieit class were chosen for the class teams. Thev 



are as follows — Seniors: "Tink" Mase, Shirley 
Porter, Beverly Cousins, Ruth Omundsen, and 
Marilyn Powers; Juniors: Ruth Christiansen, 
Adele Koundakjian, Anna Castellano, Lorraine 
Cousins, and Phyllis Le Shane; Sophomores: Bar- 
bara Hooper, June Dacy, Margie Gardner, Frances 
Barrow, Audrey Ware and Fay Wenckus. 

The class meets were held with Seniors coming 
out on top. 

The results were as follows: 



Seniors 
1246 

Juniors 
1258 

Seniors 
1257 



vs. 



vs. 



vs. 



4-0 



4-0 



Sophomores 

1066 
Sophomores 

1132 
Juniors 
1156 4-0 

The five girls with the highest total from these 
meets were chosen for the varsity which bowled 
against the faculty team. You have probably no- 
ticed these varsity bowlers wearing the unique 
pins which Miss Frost made herself. These girls 
aire Ruth Christiansen, Marilyn Powers, Beverly 
Cousins, "Tink" Mase, and Anna Castellano. 

It was an upset, as far as the girls are con- 
cerned, when on April 4 the faculty Bowling 
Team defeated the Girls' Varsity Team by sixteen 
pins, in a meet at the Brentwood alleys. The 
girls tried hard but were not expert enough to 
beat the crack Faculty Team, led by Miss Frost, 
who was high bowler for the day with 282, fol- 
lowed by "Mai" Powers with 261. 
Here is the line-up: 



Miss Sewall 


235 


B. 


Cousins 


223 


Miss Grover 


224 


A. 


Castellano 


200 


Miss Hyde 


217 


T. 


Mase 


241 


Vliss Stewart 


242 


M. 


Powers 


261 


Miss Frost 


282 


R. 


Christiansen 


259 



1200 



118-i 




^^.—o^,— .-*.-,-*-► — Class of 1944 — ~» 



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MISS ANTOINETTE ! 

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20th Century Stage School 
of Dancing 



For Your 
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WALTHAM 



11:30-2:00 



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CANDYLAND 



Home of Homemade Candies 



and 



Ice Cream 



348 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 






ABEL MELANSON 



WILLIAM H. MORRIS 



LADIES' SUITS 



11 CHURCH STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



j Cleansing, Pressing & Repairing ] 



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Frames Windows Doors $ 

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216 NEWTON STREET WALTHAM, MASS. ■ 

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WALtham 4420-4421 | 



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Thousands of Records in Stock j 

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WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 



AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



716 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 









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I BRENTON E. TYLER { ROBERT B. JOHNSON 






INSURANCE 
REAL ESTATE 



682 Main Street 
Waltham, Mass. 

Telephone WALtham 4808 



COMPANY 

JEWELERS SINCE 1873 

653 Main Street 
Waltham 



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I MISS ATWOOD 

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GIFTS i 

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I GREETING CARDS ! 

i 685 Main Street Waltham ' 

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LEARY'S MARKET ! j 

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Telephone WALtham 4808 I j 

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Telephone WALtham 1430 , 

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JOSEPH O'NEIL 



OPTOMETRIST ! 



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Examination by Appointment 



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V »(>^»<H 



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MILK 



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ELM SPRING FARM | 



Waltham 2313 



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H. I. JOHNSON 
DRUG COMPANY 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



WALTHAM 



! 390 MAIN STREET 

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NEWTON SECRETARIAL SCHOOL 

"EXCELLENT TRAINING OF INDIVIDUAL" 

DAY DIVISION — EVENING DIVISION — SUMMER DIVISION 

Intensive Secretarial Course — Stenographic Course 

Clerical Course 
SPECIAL COURSES IN: 



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Typewriting 

Gregg Shorthand 
Dictation 



313 Washington Street 
NEWTON 



SPEEDSCRIPT 

BIGelow 5711 
LASell 4303 



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SPENCER 
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MOODY and SPRUCE STREETS 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



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THE 



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Try Royal Chocolates 

TASTY LUNCHES 
HOMEMADE CANDIES 



WOLLRATH & SONS, 
INC. 



FLORISTS 



WALtham 3700 - 3701 



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Waltham I 

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LOUIS 
TAILOR SHOP 



WHEELER SQUARE 
DRUG CO. 



JOHN WALKER 
Reg. Pharm. 



11 FELTON STREET WALTHAM ! 554 Moody Street Waltham ! 

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ALLEN KNITWEAR I 



Complete Lines of 

BATHING SUITS AND 

SWEATERS 



J 331 MOODY STREET WALTHAM \ 



JEAN'S 
LUNCHEONETTE 

THOMAS M. NOLAN, JR. 



220 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 



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I Thomas P. Holland Co. 
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USED FURNITURE ! 

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! 15 LEXINGTON ST., WALTHAM I 

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MEN'S WEAR 

TUXEDOS FOR RENT 

95 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



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MELVIN J. HAM, JR. 

Hand Forged Ornamental 

Iron Work 

ANDIRONS 

Made and Repaired 



213 Lexington Street 



WALtham 2240-W 



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[ 

HELEN M. WHITTEN ! 

1 



STUDIO OF DANCING 

814 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, 

Special Classes for 

High School Students 

All Types of Dancing Taught 

Individually or in Class 



| i 

, ENTERPRISE STORES ! 



MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



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CROSS GRILL 

334 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 






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I HAIR WORRY YOU? j 
! SEE ME TODAY! I 






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| ANGELO'S technique of modern scalp treat- 

I ment. When you call on ANGELO, an expert I 

for advice and consultation, he will show you | 

exactly what ANGELO'S treatment is and j 

how it works. He will show you how it re- j 

I moves dandruff scales and soothes the scalp j 
\ itch caused by exuvia, or Alopecia Areata, 
1 Ringworm of the Scalp and Skin. 

! ! 

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( day and learn more about this Modern Scalp 1 

| Treatment. 

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Stop and relax at Angelo's Barber Shop. The I 

home of scientific bartering. Specializing in j 

! facials, scalp treatments and massages. Pre- j 

j mature Baldness. | 

Angelo's Barber Shop 



FRANK DiMURRO i 

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WALtham 1875 ' 

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107 CHARLES STREET, WALTHAM j 

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19 ELM STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 






INC. 



Complete Household 
Furnishing 



! GRIFF FURNITURE i 



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WALtham 2931 



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j 442 MOODY STREET WALTHAM 

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j ARMAND STUDIO 

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NEWEST MACHINERY USED IN SKATE SHARPENING 




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S. OLIVERI 

UP TO DATE SHOE REPAIRER 
Best Stock Used at Most Reasonable Prices 

15 PELTON STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

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J 

! TO YOU 



j 



WHO ARE ABOUT TO GRADUATE 



May we suggest a wonderful new field of em- 
ployment for you when you graduate? Yes, it's 
war work, making radio tubes, but there's a real 
post-war opportunity, too. Why not come in 
and talk over your future with us now — before 
school closes. 

Apply Personnel Division 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION 
CORPORATION 



55 Chapel Street 



Newton 



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